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Teens Who Stutter

Contact us for more information!
If you (or someone you know)
are interested in more information
about these opportunities for
young people who stutter, please
contact Linda R. Hinderscheit at 
hinde001@umn.edu.

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regulations, please note that if
you would like to communicate via
email, you must submit an
PDF iconelectronic consent form.

Stuttering is a debilitating challenge for people in all walks of life, but it can be especially daunting for teenagers due to the intense social pressures these young people face. Young people who stutter often feel isolated and alone when they deal with their disorder on a daily basis, but meeting peers who face the same challenge can be an extraordinarily powerful experience for these young people.

The Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences offers Teens Who Stutter (TWST), a group for teenagers who stutter. Linda Hinderscheit, a speech‐language pathologist with over 30 years of clinical experience, oversees these programs. Joel Korte, a graduate of our Master’s Program in Speech-Language Pathology, and Josh Anderson, a speech-language pathologist in the St. Paul Public Schools, facilitate most of the meetings. Joel and Josh are both young adults who stutter. They are incredible role models for our kids.

Transportation is not provided; however, the program is no-cost to the participants, thanks to a generous donor.

The support group for teenagers is offered throughout the year approximately once per month. Meeting dates may vary due to the availability of the group leaders. The group typically meets at Shevlin Hall on the U of M east bank campus in Minneapolis. Meetings are held early on Sunday afternoons from 1:00 to 2:15 and focus on topics that the teens would like to discuss. Food and beverages are typically provided.

Parents should contact Linda Hinderscheit (hinde001@umn.edu) to be put on an email contact list. They will then receive announcements regarding upcoming meetings.  Email is also used to contact parents in the event a meeting needs to be canceled at the last minute due to dangerous driving conditions or illness. It is very important to have a parent’s email address.

"As a stutterer, it is so easy to feel isolated and like you are the only one out there who has to deal with this. Meeting other people who stutter, both like you and not like you, is a great morale-booster. It's just a good, supportive environment overall, populated by good people." —Teen Participant