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Side by side portraits: Roy Cook and Chris Nagel

Graffiti, DJs, and Comic Books

Both Chris Nagel and Roy T. Cook spend a lot of time thinking about underappreciated art forms. Nagel argues that street art challenges popular notions of what art is, and holds that DJ sets are no less musical works than is Beethoven’s Fifth. Cook explores the philosophical implications of popular art, including comic books, designer toys, and LEGO sculptures.
Maddy Gluek from philosophy headshot

The Practical Side of Philosophy

Maddy Glueck finds her studies in sociology and philosophy to be complementary. Her research assistantship over the summer gave her the opportunity to apply the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills she developed in both disciplines towards a positive end. Though unsure of her future plans, her studies have provided her with a readiness that is, as she puts it, “good for life in general”, wherever it might lead her.
Image of Melanie Bowman from the Department of Philosophy

Knowledge and Wild Rice Research

Philosophers have long grappled with the question: What is knowledge? But Melanie Bowman considers a different question: How does knowledge belong? Rooting disagreement and misunderstanding between wild rice researchers and the Anishinaabe people in differing attitudes towards knowledge, Bowman highlights the role that one’s conception of knowledge plays in one’s worldview.
Photograph of professor Naomi Scheman

Naomi Scheman: The Study of Trust

What is trust and what is considered trustworthy? Naomi Scheman develops the concept of trust based on philosophical theories and practice. At the University, Scheman evaluates how various University communities experience and create trust. Her passion and commitment are shown through her work with individuals who merge academia and activism.

The Risk of 'Sitting Still'

Asher Waldfogel (BA 1975- Philosophy) combined his passions for the humanities and his interest in technology to eventually run several high-tech companies. Waldfogel was born with a passion for innovation and risk, and learned the key to success is understanding trends and timing when everything happens quickly and nothing is permanent.