Industrial/Organizational Psychology (I/O)

The content of I/O psychology as a subfield of psychology is very broad. It ranges from the study of basic human abilities important for task performance to the investigation of managerial problem-solving behavior to a consideration of how work motivation is influenced by characteristics of the organization versus characteristics outside the organization. Since the field cannot be described in a few paragraphs, the newcomer is advised to take an undergraduate course or two if possible and/or peruse a number of textbooks in the field and relevant chapters in the Annual Review of Psychology. The Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology also maintains an informative website.

Within I/O psychology, you may choose to specialize in such areas (among others) as personnel psychology, training and development, individual assessment, work motivation, group and organizational processes, or psychometrics. Such specialization may be achieved with courses in counseling psychology, advanced seminars in industrial/organizational psychology, personality assessment, social psychology, cognition, psychometrics, statistics, speech communications, sociology, industrial relations, marketing, political science, or management.

Curriculum

First year research requirement

Immediately upon entrance to the program, you will become involved with a new or continuing faculty research project. The goal of this "early research experience" is to develop enthusiasm for and interest in research.

You will also develop and carry out a "first year research project". This may be an outgrowth of the early research experience, or it may be completely separate. The goal is to identify a topic by the end of your first semester. It is not crucial that the you originate the idea, but it is the intent that you develop and execute the project (as opposed to assiting on a faculty project).

Completion of the first year project requires that you submit a written product to a scientific journal or conference. A note from your advisor to your file documents completion of the project. Time to complete the project may vary given its nature (e.g., some may require lengthy data collection, while others make use of existing data). Normally, we expect completion prior to the midway point of the second year, but advisor judgment as to whether the student is making timely progress is the final arbiter.

Prototypic Program of Study

Since you are required to satisfy a set of general distribution requirements in each of four areas (individually chosen), you will spend a significant portion of your first two years taking the relevant courses. Most students then begin the I/O psychology seminar at the start of their second year. This sequence runs for two years and is intended to examine all the major I/O topic areas in depth. It is also an opportunity to build professional identification with the field and to develop professional associations and friendships with students and faculty that will last for years to come.

Year one

Fall

Psych 5707 – Personnel Psychology
Psych 5862 – Psychometrics
Psych 8814 – Analysis of Psychological Data I

Spring

Psych 5708 – Organizational Psychology
Psych 8993 – Research Methods in I/O Psychology
Psych 8815 – Analysis of Psychological Data II
Year two

Fall

Psych 8701 – I/O Seminar (Campbell, Kuncel, Ones, Sackett, Schmidt)
Select among stats, methods, I/O specialty seminars, and other courses within or outside psychology, in consultation with your advisor

Spring

Psych 8702 – I/O Seminar (Campbell, Kuncel, Ones, Sackett, Schmidt)
Select among stats, methods, I/O specialty seminars, and other courses within or outside psychology, in consultation with your advisor
Year three

Fall

Psych 8703 – I/O Seminar (Campbell, Kuncel, Ones, Sackett, Schmidt)
Select among stats, methods, I/O specialty seminars, and other courses within or outside psychology, in consultation with your advisor

Spring

Select among stats, methods, I/O specialty seminars, and other courses within or outside psychology, in consultation with your advisor
Year four/five
Years 4 and 5 – Dissertation

Core Faculty

John Campbell, Professor
Nathan Kuncel, Associate Professor & Marvin D. Dunnette Distinguished Professor
Deniz Ones, Hellervik Professor of Industrial Psychology & Distinguished McKnight University Professor, Area Director
Paul Sackett, Professor & Beverly and Richard Fink Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Liberal Arts
Aaron Schmidt, Associate Professor & Marvin D. Dunnette Distinguished Professor

Affiliated Faculty

Elizabeth Campbell, Assistant Professor,Work and Organizations Department
Michelle Duffy, Professor & Board of Overseers Professorship in Work and Organizations Work and Organizations Work and Organizations Department, Center for HR and Labor Studies
Theresa M. Glomb, Professor & McFarland Professor of Organizational Behavior Work and Organizations Work and Organizations Department, Center for HR and Labor Studies
John Kammeyer-Mueller, Associate Professor Work and Organizations Department, Center for HR and Labor Studies
Connie Wanberg, Professor & Industrial Relations Faculty Excellence Chair Work and Organizations Department, Center for HR and Labor Studies
Le Zhou, Assistant Professor, Work and Organizations Department, Center for HR and Labor Studies