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Graduate Students - PhD

Name Contact Specialties
Yu-Wen Chen chen1887@umn.edu Motor speech disorders: interactions of the motor and sensory systems in speech production, association of audition and somatosensationto speech production in movement disers, i.e., Parkinson's disease
Coral Dirks hans3675@umn.edu Psychoacoustics: hearing loss, hearing aids, cochlear inplants, single-sided deafness and cochlear implants, personal sound amplification systems, spectral processing
Heekyung Han hanxx671@umn.edu Diagnostic audiology and psychoacoustics: scoring accuracy of clinical practice, speech perception in non-native English speakers
Timothy Huang huan0795@umn.edu Language assessment and intervention: connections between semantics and pragmatics, working with children with higher functioning ASD.
Hannah Julien julie006@umn.edu Language assessment & intervention: social communication and intervention with people with ASD, communicative repair produced by children with ASD, cultural orientation toward disability
Tess Koerner koern030@umn.edu Neural coding of speech in noise: brain imaging techniques to examine the neurophsyiological processes underlying speech perception, effects of background noise on speech perception using cortical event-related potentials (ERPs)
Jolene Hyppa Martin jhyppama@d.umn.edu Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC): organizing vocabulary in graphic mode AAC systems, improving social experiences for individuals who use AAC
Trevor Perry perry541@umn.edu Hearing loss: mechanisms underlying related impairments, finding new ways to help people with hearing loss overcome them
Jocelyn Yu yuxxx583@umn.edu Cognitive and auditory processing: impacts of hearing loss and cognitive impairments on speech perception
Luodi Yu yuxx0319@umn.edu Speech perception in individuals with typical developing autism, auditory processing using EEG and fMRI: cortical and subcortical auditory processing impacting speech perception in individuals with autism or cross-language issues (e.g., pitch perception in tone and non-tone language speakers)