BA in Spanish Studies

Latin American countries are our most important trading partners.

United States has almost 40 million native Spanish speakers. By 2050, it will become the largest Spanish-speaking country in the world. 

There are more Spanish speakers in the United States than there are speakers of Chinese, French, Italian, Hawaiian, and the Native American languages combined. 

There is a huge demand in the US for Spanish-speakers in nursing, construction management, and media, among many other positions.

Students majoring in Spanish studies develop a critical understanding of the cultural and linguistic production of the diversity of Spanish-speaking countries. Core courses in the major provide students with the critical methods and vocabulary that ensure success in the more advanced courses, which focus on the language, literature, and culture of Spain, Spanish America, and the United States. From Spain's multicultural medieval past to its twentieth-century movement toward democracy, from the colonial to the postcolonial periods in the Americas, and to the growth of Latino culture in the United States, the major also emphasizes the changing sociohistorical context of the Spanish-speaking world's rich cultural and linguistic realities.


Almost 350 million people on Earth speak Spanish—that is many more people to interact with. Speaking Spanish is a marketable skill, so be sure to update your resume. Studying Spanish develops many serious practical skills. The ability to speak Spanish, alongside the skills honed in learning a second language, makes Spanish studies a handy complement to every other major and minor.

Cultural Competencies

Studying Spanish helps students:

  • understand and compare cultural differences, customs, and perspectives
  • understand the history, literature, art, and music of other cultures
  • appreciate diversity
  • adjust to new environments
  • expand their worldview
  • reflect on their own cultural values

Analytical and Practical Skills

Studying Spanish is a way to think critically; analyze and compare cultures, linguistics, literary works, and global issues; define complex problems; conduct research and interpret information; and create/clarify ideas. Students in this major also foster workplace skills including understanding of oral and written instructions, attention to detail, and flexibility in their learning, thinking, and communication.

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