Betsy Neibergall Anderson

Photo of Betsy Neibergall Anderson

Contact Me

andbets@umn.edu
612-625-5088

Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication
325 Murphy Hall

206 Church St SE

Betsy Anderson, Ph.D., APR, is an assistant professor of strategic communication at the University of Minnesota School of Journalism & Mass Communication. Her professional background is in agency public relations, working for firms such as Weber Shandwick and FleishmanHillard, and at the 1996 Olympic Games as an Atlanta Olympic Broadcasting liaison officer. She teaches courses such as digital content production and advertising & public relations writing. Her research focuses on the intersection of public relations and social media, including crisis communication in online settings. Anderson currently serves on the Minnesota Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) board of directors.

Educational Background & Specialties

Educational Background

  • Ph.D.: Mass Communication (Minor Area: Business - Strategic Management & Organization), University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.
  • M.A.: Journalism & Mass Communication, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.
  • B.A.: Media Communication, Bethel University, St. Paul, MN.

Curriculum Vitae

Specialties

  • Public Relations
  • Strategic Communication
  • Social Media
  • Digital Content
  • Writing
Courses Taught
  • JOUR 1001 - Introduction to Mass Communication
  • JOUR 3279W - Professional Writing for Strategic Communication
  • JOUR 4243 - Digital Content for Brand Communications
  • JOUR 4259 - Strategic Communication Case Analysis
Research & Professional Activities

Professional Activities

  • Minnesota Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) Board of Directors:
  • University of Minnesota Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) faculty co-advisor:
Publications
  • Anderson, B.D., Swenson, R. & Gilkerson, N.D. (2016). Understanding dialogue and engagement through communication experts' use of interactive writing to build relationships. [Special section: Discussion, Dialogue, and Discourse.] International Journal of Communication (10), pp. 4095-4118.
  • Gilkerson, N.D., Swenson, R. & Anderson B.D. (2016). Farmed and Dangerous?  A case study of Chipotle's branded entertainment series and polarized reactions to its satirical depiction of farming and agribusiness. Journal of Applied Communications 3(100), pp. 106-120.
  • Swenson, R., Gilkerson, N.D., & Anderson, B.D. (2016). Taking food fights online: Analysis of Chipotle’s attempt to cultivate conversation with The Scarecrow video. Public Relations Review, 42(4), pp. 695-697.
  • Porter, M.C., Anderson, B. & Nhotsavang, M. (2015). Anti-social media: executive Twitter "engagement" and attitudes about media credibility. Journal of Communication Management, 29(2), pp. 270-287.
  • Anderson, B.D., Swenson, R. & Kinsella, J.R. (2014). Responding in real-time: Creating a social media crisis simulator for the classroom. Communication Teacher, 28(2), pp. 85-95.
  • Anderson, B.D. & Swenson, R. (2013). What should we be teaching our students about digital PR? Collaborating with top industry bloggers and PR Twitter chat professionals. Teaching Public Relations Monographs, 87.