Emily M Mitamura

I am a doctoral candidate in Political Science at the University of Minnesota studying the relationship between aesthetics and social death in the wake of the Cambodian Genocide. Drawing broadly from political theory, international relations, women of color feminisms, and critical race and ethnic studies, and critical refugee studies, my work proceeds from commitments to the study of race, class, postcoloniality, and gender. My dissertation specifically interrogates the cultural, legal, and aesthetic processes by which events of mass violence become unified and mobile political objects negotiated by those living its their wake and has received support from the UMN Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship and the Institute for Advanced Studies, the Harold Leonard Film Fellowship, the UMN Community of Scholars Program, the Social Science Research Council, and the College of Liberal Arts at UMN.

Educational Background & Specialties

Educational Background

  • MA: Political Science, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, 2019.
  • Certificate: in Power, Equity, Diversity, Dept. of Political Science, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, 2018.
  • BA: Political Science, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY, 2016.

Specialties

  • international relations theory
  • postcolonial studies/theory
  • critical race and ethnic studies
  • women of color feminisms
Research & Professional Activities

Professional Activities

  • Research Assistant in Dept. of Gender Women Sexuality Studies: Research Collaborative: Bodies that Haunt: Rethinking the Political Economy of Death , 2019 - present
  • Co-Organizer: Minnesota Political Theory Colloquium , 2019 - 2020
  • Co-Organizer: Critical Race and Ethnic Studies Workshop , 2019 - 2020
  • Co-Organizer: Minnesota International Relations Colloquium , 2017 - 2018
Publications
  • Mitamura, Emily. “The Coloniality of Abridgment: Afterlives of Mass Violence in Cambodia and the US”Third World Quarterly (March 2019).
  • (Invited reprint; peer reviewed volume) Mitamura, Emily. “The Coloniality of Abridgment: Afterlives of Mass Violence in Cambodia and the US.” In Violence and the Third World in International Relations. Ed. Randolph B. Persaud and Narendran Kumarakulasingam. London: Routledge, Dec. 2019.