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Mathew Zefeldt - Hunter/Killer

Professor Mathew Zefeldt Exhibits HUNTER/KILLER

It had been speculated that the world would end in 2012, or at the very least mankind would enter a new eon. While the date came and went without a bang, unbeknownst to most humans on earth it may have actually happened, as we replaced our own minds as the smartest things on earth with quantum computing. This form of computing has led to the rise of Artificial Intelligence, and the last 5 years have seen major leaps towards creating machines smarter, stronger, and potentially more powerful than mankind. AI has now even crossed into the home with smart speakers, TV’s, and phones that have first names and know yours. What AI fundamentally means for us is impossible to calculate but we can’t deny its here and growing smarter every day. Having something on the planet that can think for itself, invent its own language, and gain access to our most secured networks is troubling enough in fantasy films, but this is increasingly closer to the truth of our reality. In Mathew Zefeldt’s installation we are confronted by the frightening side of AI, with the image of terminator painted on all surfaces of the gallery. The floor and all the walls are covered with repeating grey scale images of it. Zefeldt has then installed 4 painted canvases with pink and red terminators on top of this motif. Being inside of Zefeldt’s installation one can’t escape the feeling of being overwhelmed and in the midst of something both awe inspiring and frightening.
Lorena Molina - Nothing Hurts Like Home

Lorena Molina (MFA '15) Exhibits at the 621 Gallery in Tallahassee

Nothing Hurts like Home explores my complicated relationship with homemaking as a refugee who has experienced displacement.This project is a fragmented visual diary/Study of the challenges and markers of making a home in the between. Home has always been a battlefield. Home is where I was taught to fear. How do you make home when going home is too dangerous? What do you do with the pain that home brings? This work was influenced by my move to rural central NY as I simultaneously became a US citizen. It deals with the dislocation, otherness, and white washing caused by the process of making home in the unwelcoming. This work explores the ways I hold on to my cultural roots as everywhere I go demands adaptation and assimilation. The performances and photographs were made in El Salvador and Sauquiot, NY. They are my attempts to make sense of and connections to a state I did not choose. In 2017, I returned to my homeland after 14 years of being told it is a place I should not be. I visited my childhood home that now is ruled by gangs and I reconnected with my father. The photographs and videos aim to make a visual map of the interconnections between the land I was forced to leave, my place here, and what remains of the memory I once called home. This work is my reconciliation and acceptance of a reality that it is part of the immigrant experience to never truly be there nor here; while at the same time I aim to find the possibilities of existing in a state of liminality to create a space where my brown body can thrive and exist.