Scholarly Events

Since its inception, the Center for Austrian Studies (CAS) has offered a regular series of presentations by scholars in a wide variety of disciplines: the humanities, social sciences, fine arts, business, and medicine. CAS seminars range from descriptions of academic works-in-progress to presentations about more general subjects including reports of current events in Austria and Central Europe. The lectures are free; students, staff, and the public are cordially invited to attend.

Fall 2021 Public Programming

All events are listed in Central Time

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all events at the Center for Austrian Studies for the fall semester will be held remotely.

The YMCA and Relief for War Victims during WWI

Wednesday, September 8 through fall semester.

Museum exhbiit at The Bell Gallery in the Elmer L. Andersen Library. Curated by Ryan Bean (Kautz Family YMCA Archives), Lena Radauer (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg), and Dylan Mohr (PhD candidate, Department of Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature, University of Minnesota Twin Cities).

Kann Memorial Lecture: "Democracy’s Violent Birth: The Czech Legionnaires and Statue Wars in the First Czechoslovak Republic"

Tuesday, September 21 at 4:00 PM

Lecture by Nancy M. Wingfield via Zoom. Presented by the Center for Austrian Studies. 

Contemporary Developments in the Environmental Humanities

Wednesday, October 6. at 12:00 PM

Public forum via Zoom by Daniel J. Philippon, professor of English, University of Minnesota, and Alexa Weik von Mossner, professor of American studies, University of Klagenfurt. Presented by the Austrian Studies Program at the University of California, Berkeley. Cosponsored by the Center for Austrian Studies.

Austrian Actresses in Modern Theater and Thought: Adele Sandrock and Tilla Durieux

Thursday, October 15. at 11:00 AM

Public lecture via Zoom by Sara Jackson, associate professor of German studies, University of Massachusetts-Amherst,  Presented by the Department of German, Nordic, Slavic & Dutch. Cosponsored by the Center for Austrian Studies.

Bulgarian Cultural Diplomacy in the West: Between Ideology and Universal Values

Monday, October 18 at 1:00 PM

Public lecture via Zoom by Theodora Dragostinova, Department of History, The Ohio State University.

Exploring small Bulgaria’s cultural diplomacy with Western Europe and the United States in the long 1970s, this talk shows how communist elites constantly adjusted their message, swinging between culture, ideology, and propaganda, to project a new image of Bulgaria as a cultural pioneer in a pan-European context. As they opened exhibitions, organized concerts, screened films, and led book discussions, Bulgarian cultural ambassadors skillfully built new partnerships and projected a positive image of their country. Cultural diplomacy emerged as a good strategy of a small state to become a European and global player.

Presented by the Center for Austrian Studies. Cosponsored by the Department of History and the Center for German & European Studies. 

Four Towns that Moved: Mass Mining and the Transformations of Lives and Landscapes in the 20th Century

Thursday, November 4 at 4:00 PM

Public lecture via Zoom by Eagle Glassheim, Department of History, University of British Columbia.

Without mass destruction mining, mass production and consumption would not be possible. The vastly increased scale of twentieth-century construction and consumption required technologies of equivalent scale to mine iron, coal, copper, asbestos, and other raw materials. The advent of highly-mechanized, high-throughput, mass-destruction mining led to surges in production that largely met the increasing global demand for metals and minerals in the mid-twentieth century. It also fundamentally changed landscapes, labor, and ways of life in mining regions. Glassheim’s talk will explore these changes through case studies of mining towns in Czechoslovakia, Quebec, Montana, and Minnesota.  The recent history of mass destruction mining helps us see hidden connections between ourselves, the materials of our consumption, and remote mining landscapes and communities.

Presented by the Center for Austrian Studies. Cosponsored by the Department of German, Nordic, Slavic & Dutch, the Center for German & European Studies, the Environmental Humanities Initiative, the Department of American Studies, and the Department of History.

Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet and the Job of the Translator

Monday, November 15 at 4:00 PM

Public lecture via Zoom by Damion Searls.

Rilke's famous letters of advice and consolation have been beloved for decades and translated many times; the 2020 translation by Damion Searls is the first to include the recently rediscovered letters from the "Young Poet" to Rilke, making the correspondence a true dialogue for the first time. In this event, Searls will read from both sides of the correspondence and discuss how the rediscovered letters from Franz-Xaver Kappus change our understanding of Rilke's own letters; he will also discuss some of the challenges this posed for editing, presenting, and translating the book. Should Rilke's classic ten letters be presented as a whole, or in alternation with Kappus's? How can the book appeal to new readers as well as re-readers interested in the new material? How do these editorial decisions turn into translation decisions?

Presented by the Center for Austrian Studies. Cosponsored by the Department of German, Nordic, Sclavic & Dutch, the Center for German & European Studies, and the Department of Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature.