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PhD News 2016-17

What are our award-winning doctoral students and alumni publishing and presenting?
May 23, 2017

Graduate student Amanda Taylor

Graduate student Amanda Taylor
Doctoral student Amanda Taylor successfully defended her dissertation this spring

Dissertations Defended

Jennifer Baltzer-Lovato, "Sound, Gender, Body, and the Individual Will in Nineteenth-Century Literature" (advisor: Andrew Elfenbein).

Wesley Burdine, "Feeling Out of Time: Phenomenal Bodies and Temporality in the Fin de Siècle" (advisors: Jani Scandura and Tony Brown).

Hyeryung Hwang, "Thinking Beyond Modernism: Peripheral Realism and the Ethics of Truth-Telling" (advisor: Timothy Brennan). Hwang received a Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Seonna Kim, "The Figures of the Stateless No-body in the 'Brave New World'" (advisor: Josephine Lee).

Stephen McCulloch, "The Total Train System: Technology and Progressivism in Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century American Literature" (advisor: Lois Cucullu).

Katie Sisneros, "'The Abhorred Name of Turk': Muslims and the Politics of Identity in Seventeenth-Century English Broadside Ballads" (advisor: Nabil Matar). Sisneros received a two-year Mellon/ACLS Public Fellowship at the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

Amanda Taylor, "Fabricating the Martial Body: Anatomy, Affect, and Armor in Early Modern England and Italy" (advisors: John Watkins and Shirley Garner).

Students

Elizabeth Alderks presented "Literary Answers to Social Crisis: Kierkegaardian Irony and the Ethics of World-Historical Change" at the meeting of the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Studies in Minneapolis, May 12-14.

Amanda Alexander received a Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship (Dutch) for 2017-18. She presented "Atheism, the Supernatural, and Sublimity: Reading Lovecraft through Percy Bysshe Shelley" at the Pop Culture Association/American Culture Association National Conference in San Diego, CA, in April. She also presented "Daughters Loved So Well: Monstrous Femininity in Goethe's 'Die Braut von Korinth' and Coleridge's 'Christabel'" at the March-April American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Annual Meeting in Minneapolis.

David Andrews published the widely reviewed book Why Does the Other Line Always Move Faster? The Myths and Misery, Secrets and Psychology of Waiting in Line with Workman Press. He was interviewed about the book in The Atlantic. He was awarded a Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship for this summer.

Amy Bolis presented "Othello: The Remix: Creating an Internationally Successful Adaptation" at the Shakespeare Association of America Conference in Atlanta, GA, in April.

Christopher Bowman was awarded a Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship (Norwegian) for this summer. He presented "Twisted Robin Hood: Fraudulent Masculinity in The Wolf of Wall Street" at the Midwest Popular Culture/American Culture Conference in Chicago, IL, October 2016; "Changing the Narrative: Viewing the Present from the Future," at "The World in 2050: Imagining and Creating Just Climate Futures," UC Santa Barbara Virtual Conference, November 2016; and "Internalizing Disaster: Catastrophe and Mortality in the Works of Don DeLillo" at the Pop Culture Association/American Culture Association National Conference, San Diego, CA, April 2017.

Matthew Brogden won the Ruth Drake Dissertation Fellowship for 2017-18.

Eunkyung Cho passed her preliminary exams.

Yuan Ding received an Asian American Studies Program Travel Award and a Guangzhou Fellowship for 2017-18. She presented "The Fleeting Self: Performing Diasporic Identity in the Non-Place of Literary Creation" at the Modern Language Association Convention in Philadelphia, PA, in January.

Jonas Erickson was awarded a Union Pacific Research Grant to conduct dissertation research in California, summer 2017. He passed his preliminary exams.

Amy Fairgrieve received support from the Graduate Research Partnership Program for her summer project "'Six Paper Bags in the British Museum': Working in the Archive in (and on) Sartor Resartus" with faculty project advisor Andrew Elfenbein. She presented "Reading as Retreat: Current Events in William Cowper's 'The Task'" at the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Annual Meeting in Minneapolis, March-April.

Elizabeth Howard won an Ashgate RSVP Travel Grant to attend the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals Conference at Albert-Ludwigs-Universität, Freiburg, Germany, in July, where she will present "'To Mark an Era in Observation': Krakatoa's Impact on Liminal Spaces in the Late Nineteenth-Century Scientific Periodical." She also received a Department Research Grant for spring-summer 2017, for research on Hopkins and the Oxford Movement, at Keble College, Oxford University, and a Lumen Christi Institute Summer Fellowship for study at Merton College, Oxford, in July. While in England, she will present "Images of Cataclysm and Communication: The Eruption of Krakatoa and the Intrusion of the Periodical into M. P. Shiel's The Purple Cloud" at the Victorian Popular Fiction Association Conference "Travel, Translation, and Communication," in London. She will be an Intercollegiate Studies Institute Weaver Fellow this August. She published Worldview Guide for Canterbury Tales with Canon Press in March, a short, introductory book written for a high-school audience. In 2018 she will publish "'To Admire and Do Otherwise': Hopkins' Modified Translations of Shakespeare's Casket Song" in Victorian Poetry. In April, she presented "'Gathering Together the Facts': Krakatoa and Nature's Changing Discourse at the End of the Century" at the University of St. Thomas Graduate English Conference in St. Paul and was an invited colloquium participant for "American Universities and the Principles of a Free Society" at the Intercollegiate Studies Institute in Mecosta, MI. In May, she presented "Fancy Bred and Dead: Gerard Manley Hopkins' Adaptations in Form as a Means of Performance" at the North American Victorian Studies Association panel at the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English Conference in Toronto.

Hyeryung Hwang was awarded the Samuel Holt Monk Prize for the Best Article by a Graduate Student for "Said and the Mythmaking of Auerbach's Mimesis," published in CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (18.1). She received a Southern American Studies Association Travel Grant to attend the SASA conference in Williamsburg, VA, in March, where she presented "After Magic: Juan Gabriel Vásquez's The Sound of Things Falling and the Poetics of Latin American Neo-Realism." She also presented "Political Ethics in Chang-dong Lee's Poetry" at the Midwest Popular Culture/American Culture Association Conference, Chicago, IL, October 2016. Her essay "Peripheral Aesthetics after Modernism: South Korean Neo-Realist Cinema and Chang-dong Lee's Poetry" is forthcoming this fall in The Global South.

Youngbin Hyeon passed his preliminary exams.

Bomi Jeon passed her preliminary exams.

Jennifer Jodell passed her preliminary exams.

Melissa Johnson received support from the Graduate Research Partnership Program for her summer project "'The Play is the Image': Comic Book Adaptations of Shakespeare" with faculty project advisor Katherine Scheil. She passed her preliminary exams.

Hannah Jorgenson passed her preliminary exams.

Marc Juberg was awarded a Graduate School Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship for 2017-18 for his dissertation "Satirizing the Audience: Shakespeare and the Uses of Poetic Obscurity." He also won a Darwin Patnode Fellowship for summer 2017.

Jennifer Kang received an American Comparative Literature Association Travel Grant to attend the 2017 ACLA Annual Meeting in March and a Midwest Writing Centers Association Scholarship and Travel Grant to attend the 2016 International Writing Centers Association conference. She co-presented "Developing a Staff Co-Mentoring Program in a Writing Center" at the Madison Area Writing Center Colloquium, Madison, WI, in February, and "Developing a Staff Co-Mentoring Program" at the IWCA conference in Denver, CO, October 2016. She also was awarded a Diversity Pre-Doctoral Teaching Fellowship for 2017-18, for teaching at the University of Minnesota, Morris.

Seona Kim presented "Making and (Dis)Performing Exceptional Korean/American Adoptee Subjectivity in Jane Jeong Trenka's Memoirs" at the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Annual Conference in Pasadena, CA, November 2016.

Katelin Krieg was awarded a Graduate School Doctoral Dissertation Conference Presentation Grant. She will publish the essay "Ruskin, Darwin, and Looking Beneath Surfaces" in the forthcoming Victorian Literature and Culture 45.4. She presented "Victorian Groupthink" at the North American Victorian Studies Association Conference in Phoenix, AZ, November 2016.

David Lemke was awarded an Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship for 2017-2018 for his project "Imagining Reparations: African-American Utopianism and Visions for a Just Society." His host center will be the U's Institute for Advanced Study. He passed his preliminary exams.

Jenna Lester presented "Legitimizing Female Self-Transformation in Early Modern English Drama: Mariam and the Performing Female Body" at the Northeast Modern Language Association meeting in Baltimore, MD, in March. She passed her preliminary exams.

Jen-Chou Liu won a Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grant to attend the 2017 Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference at the Newberry Library, Chicago, IL, this past January, where he presented "'A Lewd and Ungenerous Engraftment': Samuel Richardson's Grafting Metaphor of Authorship."

Charlotte Madere was awarded a Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship (Hindi) for summer 2017. She also received support from the Graduate Research Partnership Program for her summer project "Imagination, Intimacy, and Improvisation in Didactic Eighteenth-Century Writings on India" with faculty project advisor Andrew Elfenbein. She passed her preliminary exams.

Samantha Majhor presented "Imagining Liberation: Susan Power's The Grass Dancer and the Dress at the Field Museum" at the Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies Graduate Conference, August 2016. She also participated on the UMN Institute for Advanced Study panel "Sovereignty Matters: Perspectives on the Dakota Access Pipeline Project," October 2016. In March, she presented "'Let this dress save you': Material Assemblage and the Remaking of Fleur Pillager in Louise Erdrich's Four Souls" at the Native American Literature Symposium.

Melissa Merte won a COGS Conference Travel Grant from the Council of Graduate Students, this past May, which allowed her to present "Engaged Visions of London and Florence in Aurora Leigh" at the North American Victorian Studies Association in Florence, Italy. She also presented "Framing Female Memories in Mary Shelley's Short Stories" at the Nineteenth Century Studies Association Conference in Charleston, South Carolina, in February. She passed her preliminary exams.

Saeide Mirzaei was awarded the 2017 Marcella DeBourg Fellowship from the Creative Writing Program.

David Moberly published the entries "Lodowick Carlell," "Gilbert Swinhoe," and "William Okeley," in Christian-Muslim Relations: A Bibliographical History 1500-1900 (Brill, 2016). He also published "Slavery: Englishwomen Kidnapped into Slavery (North Africa and the Middle East)" in A Biographical Encyclopedia of Early Modern Englishwomen, Exemplary Lives and Memorable Acts, 1500-1650, edited by Anna Riehl Bertolet, Carole Levine, and Jo Eldridge Carney (Routledge), and "The Taming of the Tigress: Fatima Rushdi and the First Arabic Shrew" in the winter 2016 Critical Survey. He presented "The Taming of the Tigress: Fatima Rushdi and the First Arabic Shrew" at the World Shakespeare Congress at King's College, London, August 2016. In 2017, he presented "Translations of Shakespeare's Sonnets in the Arab World" at the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL, in April; "Ophelia and Gertrude in the Arab World" in "Renaissance Afterlives Revisited," Shakespeare Association of America, Atlanta, GA, in April; and "Shakespeare in the Arab World: The First Egyptian Taming of the Shrew," at the poster session of the April Doctoral Research Showcase and at the March Doctoral Dissertation Seminar, both in Minneapolis.

Asa Olson received a Graduate School Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship for 2017-18 for his dissertation "The Vertumnal Genre: Utility and the Death of Elegy, ca. 1590-1625." He presented "Earthly Knowledge: The Map Figure in the Sermons of John Donne" at the Donne Society Conference in Baton Rouge, LA, in February, where he received an Honorable Mention, Best Graduate Student Paper. He also presented "Ianua Vota: Propertius 1.16 and Inscribed Epigram" at the Classical Association of the Middle West and South Annual Meeting in Kitchener, Ontario, in April.

Jacqueline Patz presented "Who Is this Monster? Mental Illness and the Female Villain in Pretty Little Liars" at the Midwestern Pop Culture Conference in Chicago, IL, October 2016.

Kristina Popiel passed her preliminary exams.

Zoë Rodine presented "Misty Knight, Bionic Private Eye: Blackness, Femininity, Disability, and Possibility Foreclosed" on the panel "Superhero Narratives and Disability" and "A Few Bad Apples: The Figure of the American Torturer in the War on Terror" on the roundtable "American Literature and Film of the Wars on Terror," both at the Northeast Modern Language Association Conference in Baltimore, MD, in March.

David Rodriguez-Martinez won a Beverly & Richard Fink Research Fellowship for summer 2017.

Sungjin Shin will present "'It Will Never Pass into Nothingness': Economic Counting in Endymion," at the Annual North American Society for the Study of Romanticism Conference, in Ottawa, Canada, this August.

Brett Sigurdson was awarded a Department Research Grant for spring-summer 2017, for research on the Beats in San Francisco.

Katie Sisneros won a Mellon/ACLS Public Fellowship, which supports doctoral graduates as they gain significant, career-building experience in two-year appointments. She'll work at the Minneapolis Institute of Art developing "new approaches to collection-focused content creation and delivery."

Aleisha Smith received a Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship (Chinese) for 2017-18.

Yon-Ji Sol won a Department Research Grant for spring-summer 2017, for research on Maria Edgeworth in London and Dublin. She presented "Growing out of Shakespeare: A Child as a Reader in Maria Edgeworth's Harrington and Renewal of English Identity" at the British Women Writer’s Conference in Chapel Hill, NC, in June.

Anne Marie Spidahl presented "Dressing Disaster in Delaney's Dhalgren" at the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment Conference in Detroit, MI, in June.

Jeffrey Squires was awarded a Graduate School Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship for 2017-18 for his dissertation "The Exculpation of the Desperate: Comforting the Desperate in Early Modern England, 1580-1680."

Amanda Taylor's essay "The Body as Battleground: Bodily Knowledge Production in the Works of Andreas Vesalius and Edmund Spenser" is forthcoming in The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, in the special issue "The Languages of Anatomy."

Andrea Waldrep received a Celtic Studies Fellowship for summer 2017, to attend the Celtic Studies Summer School in Dublin, Ireland.

Bomi Yoon received support from the Graduate Research Partnership Program for her summer project "'Speaking Through Silence': Uncovering Silent Nuances of Race in Asian American Young Adult Literature" with faculty project advisor Josephine Lee. She presented "Imagined and Reinvented Korea: Trans-Korean America in Eric Sharp's Middle Brother" at the American Society for Theatre Research Conference in Minneapolis, November 2016.

Ali Zimmerman received a COGS Conference Travel Grant from the Council of Graduate Students to travel to Miami, FL, to present "Reclaiming the Snow Queen: Folk Interventions on Disney's Frozen" at the American Folklore Society conference, October 2016.

Alumnae/i

Jessica Apolloni (PhD 2016) accepted a position as Assistant Professor at Christopher Newport University (Virginia).

Julia Bleakney (PhD 2004), the longtime director of Stanford University's Center for Writing and Speaking, has taken a position at Elon University, in North Carolina, as Writing Center Director. She is also a current board member for the International Writing Centers Association.

Taiyon Coleman (MFA 2003; PhD 2013) received a 2017 McKnight Artist Fellowship for Writers, Loft Awards in Creative Prose, in the amount of $25,000 to complete a novel.

David Garrison (PhD 1987) has retired from LaGrange College (Georgia), where he most recently served as Provost. He had previously acted as College of Liberal Arts Dean at Georgia Southwestern State University in Americus and as associate dean of Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. He also taught and led the Department of English at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

David Jones (PhD 2000) is Professor of English and Honors Education and Director of Graduate Studies in English at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. He is also a bandleader and musician who released his sixth CD, titled Chippewa Love, last year. A recipient of his university’s 2015 Excellence in Service Award, he serves as Faculty Fellow for Equity, Diversity and Inclusiveness.

Megan McGurk (PhD 2007) published Sass Mouth Dames: 30 Essential Women's Pictures 1929-1939 and is planning two more volumes to cover the 1940s and '50s. She does a monthly podcast (with Danielle Smith) about women's pictures, called Any Ladle's Sweet That Dishes Out Some Gravy

Karen Roggenkamp (PhD 2007) published Sympathy, Madness, and Crime: How Four Nineteenth-Century Journalists Made the Newspaper Women's Business (Kent State University Press).

Benjamin Utter (PhD 2016) accepted a position as Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Ouachita Baptist University.

Send us your job, award, and publication updates—or your memories of English study at the University of Minnesota! Email sutt0063@umn.edu