Volume 30: Ideologies of Hispanism

Edited by Mabel Moraña

Bringing together contributions from top specialists in Hispanic studies—both Peninsular and Latin American—this volume explores a variety of critical issues related to the historical, political, and ideological configuration of the field. Dealing with Hispanism in both Latin America and the United States, the volume's multidisciplinary essays range from historical studies of the hegemonic status of Castillian language in Spain and America to the analysis of otherness and the uses of memory and oblivion in various nationalist discourses on both sides of the Atlantic. Wide-ranging though they are, these essays are linked by an understanding of Hispanism as a cultural construction that originates with the conquest of America and assumes different intellectual and political meanings in different periods, from the time of national cultural consolidation, to the era of modernization, to the more recent rise of globalization.

Introduction
Mapping Hispanism
Mabel Moraña

Part I. Constructions of Hispanism: The Spanish Language and Its Others

  1. Spanish in the Sixteenth Century: The Colonial Hispanization of Andean Indigenous Languages and Cultures
    Lydia Fossa
  2. The Pre-Columbian Past as a Project: Miguel León Portilla and Hispanism
    Ignacio M. Sánchez-Prado
  3. “La hora ha llegado”: Hispanism, Pan-Americanism, and the Hope of Spanish/American Glory (1938–1948)
    Sebastiaan Faber

Part II. Consolidation and Transformations of Hispanism: Ideological Paradigms

  1. Rapping on the Cast(i)le Gates: Nationalism and Culture-Planning in Contemporary Spain
    Thomas Harrington
  2. Beyond Castro and Maravall: Interpellation, Mimesis, and the Hegemony of Spanish Culture
    Anthony J. Cascardi
  3. Whose Hispanism? Cultural Trauma, Disciplined Memory, and Symbolic Dominance
    Joan Ramon Resina

Part III. Latin Americanism and Cultural Critique

  1. Latin America in the U.S. Imaginary: Postcolonialism, Translation, and the Magic Realist Imperative
    Sylvia Molloy
  2. Mules and Snakes: On the Neo-Baroque Principle of De-Localization
    Alberto Moreiras
  3. Keeping Things Opaque: On the Reluctant Personalism of a Certain Mode of Critique
    Brad Epps

Part IV. Hispanism/LatinAmericanism: New Articulations

  1. Xenophobia and Diasporic Latin Americanism: Mapping Antagonisms Around "the Foreign"
    Idelber Avelar
  2. Hispanism in an Imperfect Past and an Uncertain Present
    Nicolas Shumway
  3. Hispanism and Its Lines of Flight
    Román de la Campa

Afterword
Nicholas Spadaccini