You are here

Eva von Dassow Wins Rome Prize

April 24, 2015

Portrait: Eva von Dassow

Portrait: Eva von Dassow
Associate professor Eva von Dassow, Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies (Photo by Pat O'Leary)

Associate professor Eva von Dassow, Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies, has received the National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Rome Prize, which annually supports advanced independent work in the arts and humanities in a unique residential community in Rome. During her residency she will be working on a book about freedom, rights, and governance in the ancient Near East.

Von Dassow teaches the history and languages of the ancient Near East. Her recent research examines the conceptualization of citizenship and the constitution of publics in Syro-Mesopotamian polities, written records as artifacts of cultural practice and temporal process, and the nature of writing as an interface between language and reader. Besides the book on freedom, her current projects include a new edition of the Hurrian “Song of Liberation,” exploring the political dimensions of the poem’s composition and its later textualization in a bilingual Hurro-Hittite edition, and co-authoring the second edition of The Ancient Near East, c. 3000-330 BC, with Amélie Kuhrt.

More than 900 applications were submitted from 46 states, Washington, DC, and Puerto Rico, making this an exceptionally competitive field.