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Portrait of Brandi Mans.

In the Costume Shop

“Every detail of a costume tells the audience something specific about the person wearing the costume,” says 2018 MFA costume design graduate Brandi Mans. She reflects on her thesis for Sarah Ruhl’s In the Next Room, in which she navigates the visual language of clothing to tell historical narratives of medical practice and female sexuality.
Portrait of Claudia Hochstein.

What is a Latin Degree?

CNES alumna and recent Jeopardy! contestant Claudia Hochstein discusses the of the value of her Latin degree—how it’s prepared her for the future, from game shows to scientific research—and how greater diversity awareness should be brought to the Latin field.
Portrait of Geoffrey Hellman.

Gunky Continua and Mathematical Structures

What is mathematics? Are the lines, planes, and intervals of mathematics composed of points, or are there other ways of thinking about these objects? According to Professor Geoffrey Hellman, questions like these have always posed problems for the discipline of mathematics. In two new books, co-authored with Stewart Shapiro of The Ohio State University, Hellman takes on these and other questions, seeking to clarify what is at stake in the various answers one might offer to them.
Portrait of JT Weaver.

A Thoughtful Approach to Dance

Recent graduate JT Weaver calls framing his dance major in a liberal arts context “game-changing.” His well-rounded education equipped him to explore ideas through movement and to create dance pieces that are thoughtfully crafted ideas of creative research. “The biggest takeaway from my time at the University is my level of awareness in all facets of my life,” Weaver says. “My years at the U instilled an approach to life that is highly thoughtful and perspective-driven.”
Portrait of Marna Wal

Exploring Global Protest Culture

At a time of unrest in South Africa, Marna Wal had the opportunity to experience protest culture firsthand. While studying abroad at the University of Cape Town, Wal was immersed in a student movement organized around increased tuition rates. This unique social atmosphere gave her insight into the complicated political culture of post-apartheid South Africa.
Prof. Samuel C. Fletcher outside in spring, brown leather jacket, glasses

Philosophy of Physics in High School Classrooms

Do scientific theories fully describe the world? Do electrons and electromagnetic fields really exist? What sets science apart from other kinds of inquiry? Philosophers of science like Professor Samuel C. Fletcher grapple with these complicated questions daily. Fletcher recently introduced this way of thinking to a group of bright high school students in the Honors Mentor Connection class at Wayzata High School.
Male student with European town in winter in background

Finding his roots: A scholarship student explores his German heritage

Philosophy major Jordan Kleist, ’19, is learning abroad in Austria thanks to the Frank D. Hirschbach Study Abroad Scholarship. Kleist is there to connect with his heritage and deepen his understanding of German philosophers through language study. “To really understand how those philosophers viewed the world and conceived their ideas, I will need to study them in their original language,” he says.

CLA Celebrates Faculty Excellence

The College of Liberal Arts gathered as a community to honor the creative, scholarly, and instructional work of our outstanding and internationally renowned faculty at Faculty Excellence held on Tuesday, April 17 in the Best Buy Theater at Northrop Memorial Auditorium. This annual event is held to celebrate faculty retiring from the College of Liberal Arts.
Portrait of Karen Ho

New Ways to See the World

Cultural anthropologist Karen Ho has recently been appointed director of CLA’s Race, Indigeneity, Gender, and Sexuality Studies initiative, which involves the cultural and social frameworks she has used in her research on the culture of finance. “[There are] a lot of intellectual and social synergies between anthropology and the study and critique of power, race, ethnic, and gender studies.”