Nels Shafer - SOFA 2018

Nels Shafer Gleams the Cube - 2018 SOFA Residency

Nels says the Department of Art has been a great place to explore because of the focus on learning by doing – he can experiment with CNC routers, laser cutters, and 3D printing, exploring art but also engineering without the constraints and prerequisites of other routes. He enjoys creating things that move, interact, or serve some function in addition to being aesthetically pleasing – taking courses in Experimental Media and 3D Modeling and Digital Fabrication only deepened his belief that art doesn’t have to be a static, pretty object you can’t touch as in traditional art museums. He prefers works that the audience can experience physically and conceptually at the same time, akin to those found in children’s or science museums.
Bianca Pettis - Jerome Printmaking

Bianca Pettis Exhibition at High Point Center for Printmaking

Bianca Janine Pettis’ prints are playful, colorful, and indeterminate. She approaches her printmaking practice as a performer - opening herself up to the moment, allowing the work to unfold before her. Through the processes of monoprinting and screenprinting, she brings to life idiosyncratic characters inhabiting a world of courageous anxiety. Pettis holds a BA in Theatre from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio and an MFA in Art from the University of Minnesota.
Ecca Echo

Reb Limerick Interviewed by Altered Esthetics

What is The Cloud made of? Water molecules or pixels? Where does it reside? The sky or the ground? Last summer, HomePaige (ongoing artistic collaborator Paige Carlson) and WurldWideReb (my primary digital alter-ego) explored these questions through the creation of a 9 episode web series. Hard Drive chronicled our 18 day road trip around the western half of the US in search of a more intimate connection with our data. We visited Google data centers, an iCloud storage facility, and a supercomputer center, finding ourselves overwhelmed by the level of secrecy and the amount of resources needed to power these monuments. As a video and performance artist, the resources I use to create my artworks are often more abstract, harder to quantify or ethically analyze. I find myself placing trust in physical hard drives to store my files, finding power in my embodied acapella voice to tell stories and inspire catharsis, feeling more present when I’m offline. Yet, I stay up to date on Climate Change data and policies by endlessly scrolling Twitter, a company known for lack of transparency around their own carbon emissions. As caring individuals in love with blooming Lilacs and obsessed with our smartphones, how do we hold these contradictions?
Frankie Yu Sofa Residency

Frankie Yu's School of Rock - 2018 SOFA Residency

The SOFA Residency is a program initiated in the Spring of 2018 at the Regis Center for Art that provides two undergraduates per semester an opportunity to create a Sculptural Object of Furniture Art with the assistance and funding of Art Department Personnel and Facilities. One of the first two SOFA Residency fellows was Frankie Bingxin Yu, in her final semester as an undergraduate, before finishing her degrees in the Spring of 2018, with undergraduate majors in Psychology and Art, and a minor in Design.
Rachel Breen - "Shroud"

Rachel Breen Exhibition at Perlman Teaching Museum

NORTHFIELD, Minn. — Exactly 1,281 white garments hang from the ceiling of the Perlman Teaching Museum’s Braucher Gallery. The collared shirts, knit sweaters, tights, and other items of clothing glow with an eerie luminosity. The 1,281 garments represent the number of Bangladeshi garment workers killed in the Rana Plaza building collapse in 2013, as well as the New Yorkers killed in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911. Both incidents, which happened 102 years apart on different continents, tragically illustrate the dangerous conditions workers who make cheap clothing have faced and continue to face.
Jordan Rosenow Amid Structure

Jordan Rosenow Exhibition at the Rochester Center for Art

Amid Structure is a multimedia installation which looks closely at minimal gestures and the subtle intimacy between objects and architecture. Raw building materials, typically used to solidify permanent structures such as 2x4s, pipes, and steel are the foundation for both domestic and industrial spaces that house/shape the body and its experiences. These materials are created and used in mass quantities where uniformity is expected and they remain hidden in the interior of walls.
Ginny Sims - AliveMag.com

Magical Re-Thinking with Ginny Sims

Welcome to the uncanny world of artist Ginny Sims. Whether due to the ubiquity of registry culture or the dual rise of the HSN and QVC, domestic ware would hardly seem to be objects of resistance—and that’s where Sims seeks to shake things up. Mining the history of English pottery, she infuses traditional forms with allusions to contemporary exigencies. Hers is an art of quiet upset—an urn that yearns, a kettle that unsettles, a vase effaced of figurative clarity. A monolithic wall appears on a commemorative plate; on another, a comic bubble simply reads “No.”
Mary Simon-Casati and Liliya Williams

Can "The Invisible" Be Pictured?

One snowy afternoon in December, several women gathered in artist Mary Simon-Casati’s southwest Minneapolis home for a little lunch and a lightweight chat about astrophysics and art. The firelit living room crackled with energy; conversation sparked and flared, bouncing from philosopher to art historian to physicist and back, traversing the cosmic terrain of dark matter, energy, quarks and their quasi-poetic names. “The thing about particles,” the artist said offhandedly, “is that none of us can see them, ever. We don’t know what they look like. Science can figure out what sort of spin they have and what it interacts with. But otherwise, we’re dealing with the unknown.” Her latest paintings and sculpture explore, in visual terms, phenomena that are largely intangible, ineffable and unseen. The result of three years of research and an intensive yearlong exchange of ideas with University of Minnesota astrophysicist Liliya Williams, her solo show “Smashing the Invisible” is on view at the university’s Regis Center for Art through Feb. 10.
Nooshin Hakim Javadi

Art as Invitation

Iranian-born artist Nooshin Hakim Javadi grew up in war. When she was a girl in the city of Qazvin, two hours northwest of Tehran, Iran’s capital, she was terrified by air raids. “My mom would pull my three siblings and me to her belly and sing a lullaby for us,” she says. “I could feel my mother’s fear—the tension in her body, the pounding of her heart—yet her singing voice would vibrate through her body into mine, and that soothed me so much.”
Lorena Molina - Nothing Hurts Like Home

Lorena Molina (MFA '15) Exhibits at the 621 Gallery in Tallahassee

Nothing Hurts like Home explores my complicated relationship with homemaking as a refugee who has experienced displacement.This project is a fragmented visual diary/Study of the challenges and markers of making a home in the between. Home has always been a battlefield. Home is where I was taught to fear. How do you make home when going home is too dangerous? What do you do with the pain that home brings? This work was influenced by my move to rural central NY as I simultaneously became a US citizen. It deals with the dislocation, otherness, and white washing caused by the process of making home in the unwelcoming. This work explores the ways I hold on to my cultural roots as everywhere I go demands adaptation and assimilation. The performances and photographs were made in El Salvador and Sauquiot, NY. They are my attempts to make sense of and connections to a state I did not choose. In 2017, I returned to my homeland after 14 years of being told it is a place I should not be. I visited my childhood home that now is ruled by gangs and I reconnected with my father. The photographs and videos aim to make a visual map of the interconnections between the land I was forced to leave, my place here, and what remains of the memory I once called home. This work is my reconciliation and acceptance of a reality that it is part of the immigrant experience to never truly be there nor here; while at the same time I aim to find the possibilities of existing in a state of liminality to create a space where my brown body can thrive and exist.