Mary Simon-Casati and Liliya Williams

Can "The Invisible" Be Pictured?

One snowy afternoon in December, several women gathered in artist Mary Simon-Casati’s southwest Minneapolis home for a little lunch and a lightweight chat about astrophysics and art. The firelit living room crackled with energy; conversation sparked and flared, bouncing from philosopher to art historian to physicist and back, traversing the cosmic terrain of dark matter, energy, quarks and their quasi-poetic names. “The thing about particles,” the artist said offhandedly, “is that none of us can see them, ever. We don’t know what they look like. Science can figure out what sort of spin they have and what it interacts with. But otherwise, we’re dealing with the unknown.” Her latest paintings and sculpture explore, in visual terms, phenomena that are largely intangible, ineffable and unseen. The result of three years of research and an intensive yearlong exchange of ideas with University of Minnesota astrophysicist Liliya Williams, her solo show “Smashing the Invisible” is on view at the university’s Regis Center for Art through Feb. 10.
Ana Mendieta Exhibition

Ana Mendieta Exhibition Travels to Berlin in Spring of 2018

Ana Mendieta (1948-1985) represents one of the most outstanding artistic positions of the 1970s and 1980s. From 20 April to 22 July 2018, the Martin-Gropius-Bau will present her multi-layered film work, which has been recently restored and digitised, the result of several years of research work. Ana Mendieta’s work moves freely between disciplines such as body art, land art and performance art, without adhering to any particular medium or movement. The common element is the recurrent use of the abstracted shape of the female form in dialogue with the surrounding environment of nature—not least in order to question the separation between nature and the human body. Her artistic work transcends many boundaries, including those of artistic disciplines, geographic and political spaces, and research into history, gender and culture.
Nooshin Hakim Javadi

Art as Invitation

Iranian-born artist Nooshin Hakim Javadi grew up in war. When she was a girl in the city of Qazvin, two hours northwest of Tehran, Iran’s capital, she was terrified by air raids. “My mom would pull my three siblings and me to her belly and sing a lullaby for us,” she says. “I could feel my mother’s fear—the tension in her body, the pounding of her heart—yet her singing voice would vibrate through her body into mine, and that soothed me so much.”
Xavier Tavera

'After the War' with Xavier Tavera - Lecturer and MFA ('17)

When Xavier Tavera (M.F.A. ‘17) moved to the Twin Cities in 1996 from Mexico City, he swapped a future law career for life as a photographer. But he also underwent an even more profound personal transition. “In Mexico, I’m nothing,” he says, referring to the fact that he can’t easily be labeled in a society where so many of his fellow citizens look like him and speak his native tongue. “But here, I’m Mexican and an immigrant and a person of color.” Understanding how that experience has impacted his fellow Latinos and their Minnesota subcultures has become a guiding force for his work. His most recent show, “AMVETS Post #5,” which is at the Minnesota History Center through April, includes 35 portraits of Mexican and Mexican-American military veterans who have returned home to St. Paul’s West Side from the battlefields of World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. Many of Tavera’s subjects enlisted in order to become U.S. citizens, only to see their rights undercut when they returned home. Some felt abandoned by the country they fought to protect.
Avigail Manneberg

Avigail Manneberg Receives 2018 Grant from the Human Rights Initiative

"A Contested Home: Memory, Commemoration and Rights around Forced Migration of Palestinians in the Galilee" will use artistic representation to engage with issues of forced migration and displacement. It explores how visual and theatrical storytelling can redress historical amnesia by seeking to foster dialogue between two groups who have a long and contentious history, Palestinians with Israeli citizenship and Jewish Israelis. Professors Kuftinec and Manneberg will work with eight local artists to develop an interdisciplinary body of work culminating in an exhibition and public art installation.
Mathew Zefeldt - Hunter/Killer

Professor Mathew Zefeldt Exhibits HUNTER/KILLER

It had been speculated that the world would end in 2012, or at the very least mankind would enter a new eon. While the date came and went without a bang, unbeknownst to most humans on earth it may have actually happened, as we replaced our own minds as the smartest things on earth with quantum computing. This form of computing has led to the rise of Artificial Intelligence, and the last 5 years have seen major leaps towards creating machines smarter, stronger, and potentially more powerful than mankind. AI has now even crossed into the home with smart speakers, TV’s, and phones that have first names and know yours. What AI fundamentally means for us is impossible to calculate but we can’t deny its here and growing smarter every day. Having something on the planet that can think for itself, invent its own language, and gain access to our most secured networks is troubling enough in fantasy films, but this is increasingly closer to the truth of our reality. In Mathew Zefeldt’s installation we are confronted by the frightening side of AI, with the image of terminator painted on all surfaces of the gallery. The floor and all the walls are covered with repeating grey scale images of it. Zefeldt has then installed 4 painted canvases with pink and red terminators on top of this motif. Being inside of Zefeldt’s installation one can’t escape the feeling of being overwhelmed and in the midst of something both awe inspiring and frightening.
Diane Willow - Tune-able Atmosphere, Beijing

Professor Diane Willow Presents Tune-able Atmosphere

The Department of Art is proud to annouce the recent participation of Assistant Professor Diane Willow in the International New Media Art Triennial Exhibition in Beijing, with the piece Tune-able Atmosphere - a large-scale interactive light sculpture. With exhibitions in four venues across the city, Willow presented Tune-able Atmosphere at the 798 Enjoy Art Museum in the 798 Art District in Beijing. Willow also gave a presentation at the related academic symposium held at the Beijing Film Academy and Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. This international symposium and exhibition was attended by artists, theorists, and curators from China, Japan, France, and Germany as well. Lucky for us here in Minnesota, a related work, titled Horizon, is currently installed at the Institute for Advanced Study on the 2nd floor of Northrop Horizon is a pair of tune-able atmospheres, one that can be tuned from each side of the glass window.
Paul Shambroom, Meeting Series

Professor Paul Shambroom's Work in the Getty Collection

LOS ANGELES – The J. Paul Getty Museum announced today the donations of two groups of photographs from collectors Leslie and Judith Schreyer and Michael and Jane Wilson. The gifts include works by artists not previously in the Museum’s collection, as well as photographs that enhance the Museum’s existing holdings. “These generous gifts complement and strengthen our holdings of important photographers from Los Angeles, New York, Europe and Asia,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “Both Les and Judy and Michael and Jane are longtime and enthusiastic supporters of the Museum and our photographs department. Their donations will provide a rich trove of images from which we will be able to organize future exhibitions.”
Sam Hoolihan at the Trylon Cinema

Q&A: Lecturer and Visual Artist Sam Hoolihan

Wednesday night, Trylon Cinema quickly sold out as University of Minnesota alumnus and adjunct professor Sam Hoolihan presented “Silence with Sound,” a collection of Super 8 and 16-mm films. The highlight of the evening was Hoolihan’s most recent work, “Stasis & Motion,” a 16-mm film consisting of three black and white projections, as well as live vocals and music by local artists John Marks and Crystal Myslajek.