Katayoun Amjadi - St Thomas

Katayoun Amjadi (3rd Yr MFA) Solo Show @ St. Thomas

Katayoun Amjadi, current 3rd Year MFA in Sculpture and Ceramics, presents In Your Backyard at the University of St. Thomas. Featuring work from her Domestic Affairs series, this solo exhibition investigates the idea of home in body, structure, and land. It explores the culturally embedded promise of security and hope engendered in the archetypal house. Join Katayoun for the opening reception on Friday, September 14th from 6-8pm. On view through December 20, 2018.
Regis Center for Art

NOW HIRING: Tenure-Track Assistant Professor – Sculpture

The Department of Art seeks an artist with expertise in contemporary sculpture practices. The ideal candidate will have a strong technical and theoretical foundation, as well as an expansive approach that embraces the changing role of contemporary art and considers its role in a global society. We seek an energetic colleague with a strong professional record and the ability to teach across the curriculum, working with non-majors, BA, BFA, and MFA students.
Mark Schoening - Porch Gallery

"Art Fair" at Mark Schoening's Porch Gallery

On a busy, tree lined street in South Minneapolis, one house stands out. On the lawn is a sculpture of a line drawing of large a white cube; welcoming passers by on to the front porch of the old victorian home, after which The Porch Gallery takes its name. Housed in the living room picture window is the exhibition Art Fair. The window has hosted a variety of exhibitions which, in some way shape or form, have inhabited the front room of Mark Schoening and Dawn England’s home since the galley opened three years ago. Art Fair, however, is unique in its scale, both figuratively and physically.
Teréz Iacovino - Fret

Teréz Iacovino, Emmett Ramstad and Mara Duvra in "Living Together"

Living Together is an exhibition featuring the work of six artists – Betsy Alwin, Mara Duvra, Teréz Iacovino, Haley Prochnow, Emmet Ramstad, and Jen Sonibare – whose practices analyze our encounters with interior environments, the objects we live with, and spaces we live in, and do so often by marrying materials and disciplines in unexpected ways. The collective works form a range-y still life or a Period Room of a conceptual parlor. Exhibitions are living arrangements; objects and artists are gathered in a room and co-habitate for months. The exhibition asks us to consider what does this living arrangement look like? How do exhibition spaces feel like home and not a showroom? What art do we choose to live with, and what artifacts do we inherit? How do we create spaces for ourselves, as artists, not only to live safely and comfortably, but to show our work publicly and form a livelihood? As art spaces adapt to changing support structures and economies, how will we change our living arrangements to continue our work