CLA Discoveries

CLA faculty and students are constantly creating and discovering.

Two women, one older one younger, sitting on chairs in a CATSS lab with microphones and padding on the walls

On Purpose: Portrait of CATSS

Sensory loss, or loss of vision, hearing, and balance increases with age and can be related to a decline in quality of life. By 2050, the Census Bureau predicts that the number of persons 65 years and older will approach 20 percent of the U.S. population. Sensory loss of all types is prevalent among aging people, accounting for a sharp decline in social engagement, and a significant reduction in socioeconomic potential.
A faculty person sits with three students from the institute.

On Purpose: Portrait of Heller-Hurwicz Economics Institute

The University of Minnesota Department of Economics has historically been one of the top in the world, producing nine Nobel Prize-winning faculty and alumni along the way. Launched in 2010, the Heller-Hurwicz Economics Institute was founded as a renewed commitment to supporting synergy in economic research, policy influence, and the communication channels required to solve real-world challenges.
Portrait of Hana Maruyama.

A PhD with a Purpose

"What happened during Japanese American incarceration is not coincidental at all—it's just how US settler colonialism has always and continues to function," says Hana Maruyama, whose grandmother and nearly 14,000 others of Japanese ancestry were displaced to Heart Mountain, the same place where the Apsáalooke American Indian Nation had been wrongfully relocated from years before. Maruyama is pursuing a PhD in American studies to further her research on the connections between Japanese American incarceration in the context of US settler colonialism.
Portrait of Susan Craddock

Teaming Up Against TB

Some of the world’s most deadly infectious diseases go unnoticed by pharmaceutical companies. One such neglected disease is tuberculosis, which claimed 1.7 million lives in 2016. Why is this widespread disease getting ignored, and how can collaborations help solve this problem? Professor Susan Craddock’s research looks into a new way of addressing neglected diseases.
Portrait of Champoux and Wisz

A Story of Collaboration

Two individuals met as instructor and student but became research partners after a course in the technical writing and communication (TWC) program. Alexander Champoux and Eric Wisz had the opportunity to collaborate on research about rhetorical theory and creative writing for the Creative Writing Studies Organization (CWSO) issue.
Portrait: Jane Sumner

Jane Sumner Creates Website to Help Diversify Syllabi

In order to make varied perspectives more accessible, Jane Sumner, professor of political science, created the Gender Balance Assessment Tool in 2016. The website generates an estimate of a syllabus' racial and gender makeup using a probability algorithm, making it easier and faster for professors to diversify their course content. Lorena Muñoz, an assistant professor in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies, is also quoted.
Portrait of Tia-Simone Gardner.

When Housing Isn’t for All: Working Toward More Inclusive Housing Strategies

Did you notice what looked like a “tiny house” on campus last year? It was actually a “mobile artist residency,” part of Tia-Simone Gardner’s research on the relationship between large cities and small housing spaces. The project aims to make small, mobile housing become a feasible option for people who need affordable or temporary housing.
Professor Ones with her intellectual family

mPerf: Measuring Workplace Performance Is Just the Beginning

It is not inconceivable that future high school students won’t have to take the SAT or the ACT, says Professor Deniz Ones. They’ll download some apps on their mobile devices, link their wearable sensors, and let colleges collect data for a couple of months. Ones is a member of the mPerf research team, conducting a multimillion dollar project about using data from wearable sensors to predict and measure workplace performance. It could have far-reaching impacts for all workplace and educational assessments.
Portrait: Joan Tronto

Democracy of Care

Caring for ourselves and others is a central part of human existence, so why isn’t it valued? In a society where economic gain is treated as the first priority, the need for care is going is mostly unaddressed. Professor Joan Tronto seeks to change this trend through her idea of a caring democracy.