CLA Discoveries

CLA faculty and students are constantly creating and discovering.

Professor Ones with her intellectual family

mPerf: Measuring Workplace Performance Is Just the Beginning

It is not inconceivable that future high school students won’t have to take the SAT or the ACT, says Professor Deniz Ones. They’ll download some apps on their mobile devices, link their wearable sensors, and let colleges collect data for a couple of months. Ones is a member of the mPerf research team, conducting a multimillion dollar project about using data from wearable sensors to predict and measure workplace performance. It could have far-reaching impacts for all workplace and educational assessments.
Portrait: Joan Tronto

Democracy of Care

Caring for ourselves and others is a central part of human existence, so why isn’t it valued? In a society where economic gain is treated as the first priority, the need for care is going is mostly unaddressed. Professor Joan Tronto seeks to change this trend through her idea of a caring democracy.
Portrait of Erin Jones and Karah VueBenson

Research in the First Person

The Gullah/Geechee Nation has a unique, centuries-old American culture that is under threat. Geography undergraduates Erin Jones and Karah VueBenson traveled to visit Gullah/Geechee people face-to-face to learn from them about their struggles and how collaborative scholarship can contribute to their efforts to protect their land.
Portrait of Soo Hyun Lee and Hui Liu

Laughing and Learning: Studying Asian Comedy Film

For some, comedy film is more than just something to watch with friends on a Friday night. Soo Hyun Lee and Hui Liu are PhD candidates in the Asian Literatures, Cultures, and Media program studying East Asian comedy cinema. They both cite their gratitude for the world-class ALL department. "I strongly desired to be a part of the department's inclusive and friendly environment," Liu says. "I feel very lucky to be a part of it."
Portrait of Brandi Mans.

In the Costume Shop

“Every detail of a costume tells the audience something specific about the person wearing the costume,” says 2018 MFA costume design graduate Brandi Mans. She reflects on her thesis for Sarah Ruhl’s In the Next Room, in which she navigates the visual language of clothing to tell historical narratives of medical practice and female sexuality.
Portrait of Geoffrey Hellman.

Gunky Continua and Mathematical Structures

What is mathematics? Are the lines, planes, and intervals of mathematics composed of points, or are there other ways of thinking about these objects? According to Professor Geoffrey Hellman, questions like these have always posed problems for the discipline of mathematics. In two new books, co-authored with Stewart Shapiro of The Ohio State University, Hellman takes on these and other questions, seeking to clarify what is at stake in the various answers one might offer to them.
Portrait of JT Weaver.

A Thoughtful Approach to Dance

Recent graduate JT Weaver calls framing his dance major in a liberal arts context “game-changing.” His well-rounded education equipped him to explore ideas through movement and to create dance pieces that are thoughtfully crafted ideas of creative research. “The biggest takeaway from my time at the University is my level of awareness in all facets of my life,” Weaver says. “My years at the U instilled an approach to life that is highly thoughtful and perspective-driven.”

CLA Celebrates Faculty Excellence

The College of Liberal Arts gathered as a community to honor the creative, scholarly, and instructional work of our outstanding and internationally renowned faculty at Faculty Excellence held on Tuesday, April 17 in the Best Buy Theater at Northrop Memorial Auditorium. This annual event is held to celebrate faculty retiring from the College of Liberal Arts.
Portrait of David Chang.

Changing the Narrative: Hawaiian History from Hawaiian Perspective

Professor David Chang challenges persistent narratives about Hawaii’s past. “For too long, history has been written as if Hawaiians were passive observers of their own history, isolated from and uninterested in the outside world,” he says. In his new book, Chang aims to update our perspective on Hawaii’s past by presenting it through the eyes of the people who lived through it.