Mini Grant Awards Spring 2018

After Janus: Worker Centers and the Future of Labor

We occupy a critical juncture concerning the future of labor. Organized labor, since the early 1980s, has faced coordinated exercises of power that have considerably weakened its influence. The currently pending US Supreme Court case Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees is expected to further limit the power of unions. What options remain available to workers to pursue their interests?

Through a study group, a community-based meeting and forum, and blog content creation, this project will explore non-traditional forms of labor organizing in the past and present, including “worker centers” in the USA and abroad.

Team Members Affiliation
Yuichiro Onishi Department of African American & African Studies
John Budd Work and Organizations (Carlson School)
Ruth Shaw Ecology, Evolution and Behavior (CBS)
Sumanth Gopinath School of Music
Elizabeth Hartman Department of American Studies
Vanessa Guzman Department of American Studies
Jimmy Patiño Department of Chicano & Latino Studies
Kristiana Wright Department of Communication Studies
Bruce Braun Department of Geography, Environment & Society
Vinay Gidwani Department of Geography, Environment & Society
J. B. Shank Department of History
Will Jones Department of History
Michael Goldman Department of Sociology
Timothy Lensmire Curriculum and Instruction (College of Education and Human Development)
Roozbeh Shirazi Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (College of Education and Human Development)
Isuru Herath Community Organizer
Ginger Jentzen Community Organizer
Nazir Khan Community Organizer
Peter Rachleff East Side Freedom Library

Intersectional Food Studies: Putting the Pieces Together

Food lies at the confluence of multiple social and political systems, particularly although not exclusively systems of gender and race. And yet, it is challenging for researchers to embed food in multiple systems, and to evaluate their importance relative to each other.

This workshop brings together scholars from multiple fields with investments in “getting it right” regarding food. We will form relationships with each other and share knowledge, as well as offer local and national public events.

Team Members Affiliation
Tracey Deutsch Department of History
Lorena Munoz Department of Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies
Martin Manalansan Department of Asian American Studies
Jigna Desai Department of Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies
Karen Brown Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change
Psyche Williams-Forson Department of American Studies, University of Maryland
Melissa Laska Epidemiology and Community Health (School of Public Health)
Traci Mann Department of Philosophy
Lisa Heldke Department of Philosophy
Craig Hedberg Environmental Health Sciences (School of Public Health)
Jennifer Breen Healthy Food, Healthy Lives Institute
Sophia Lenarz-Coy Hunger Solutions Minnesota
Valentine Cadieux Sustainability and Environmental Studies, Hamline University
Rachel Schurman Department of Sociology
Frances Bettelyeon Native American Medicine Garden
Mary Rogers Department of Horticultural Science (College of Food Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences)
Julia Grossman Department of Horticultural Science (College of Food Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences)
Sheri Breen Department of Political science
Randal Hanson Department of Geography, Environment & Society
Arshiya Sethi Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow

Reparations, Repatriation, and Redress

The workshop on reparations, repatriation, and redress brings together multiple disciplines across CLA, colleges across UMN campuses, and local communities to think through the challenges of and the possibilities for repair, atonement, return, and/or apology as potential ways to address some of the foundational wrongs of the US that have shaped longstanding institutional structures and inequalities.

In addition, we are interested in exploring whether and to what extent the rubric of “reparations” addresses the continuing inequalities experienced by indigenous communities and multiple communities of color. Using a critical and comparative approach to reparations, repatriation and redress, and engaging with local communities, we hope to catalyze thought around potential strategies to address systemic racial inequality.

Team Members Affiliation
Karen Ho Department of Anthropology
Greg Donofrio Architecture (College of Design)
Katherine Hayes Department of American Indian Studies; Department of Anthropology
Kevin Murphy Department of History
Karen Brown Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change
Catherine Squires Department of Communications Studies
Samuel J. Myers Roy Wilkins Center for Human Relations and Social Justice (Humphrey School of Public Affairs)
Edward Goetz Urban and Regional Planning (Humphrey School of Public Affairs)
Rose Brewer Department of African American and African Studies
Brenda Child Department of American Studies
Tade Okediji Department of African American and African Studies; Applied Economics (College of Food Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences)
Yuichiro Onishi Department of African American and African Studies
Terrion Williamson Department of African American and African Studies
Gabriela Spears-Rico Department of Chicano & Latino Studies
Juliana Hu Pegues Department of Chicano & Latino Studies
Jean O’Brien Department of History
Josephine Lee Department of English
Jigna Desai Department of Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies
John Matsunaga Twin Cities Japanese American Citizens League
Rashad Williams Urban and Regional Planning (Humphrey School of Public Affairs)
David Lemke Department of English