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Meet Our Students

A degree in anthropology allows our students to gain skills like critical thinking, cultural awareness as well as gather extensive real-world experience through study abroad, internships, field schools, and ethnography. These opportunities help shape future careers, whether our graduates go on to further schooling or head straight into the workforce. Here are some stories of what our current undergrads are doing with anthropology!

Jesse Paul, Class of 2016

Major: Inter-College Program (ICP) BA (anthropology & product design)
Hometown: Maple Grove, MN
Amateur snowboarder

I am curious about our ability and need to constantly create and improve. This makes us truly unique to other species. Nothing drastic has changed in our biology over the last few hundred years, but our life span has gone way up. Modern healthcare is only so successful because the body of information is transgenerational and always improving. Every generation creates new ideas, objects, and places that build upon the generation before. In a sense we are product of the things we create and I am interested in how we can use creation to foster a better world. This doesn’t fit into any specific area of study, which is why I love being in the Inter-College Program. I am able to study anthropology and product design, which are two completely different fields. Having the ability to simultaneously study both fields allows me to borrow ideas or insights from each field and strive towards creation for a better humanity.

Photo of yellow and purple prairie flowers

Butterfly Effect

When anthropology and construction management major Jeremiah Cunningham noticed that the butterflies weren't stopping to feed among the grasses planted at the Xcel Energy substation where he was interning, he discovered something that will turn into a win for Xcel Energy and the butterflies.
Photograph of Anthropology undergraduate student Courtney Fields

Negotiating Bilingual Space

When do bilingual people switch between one language to another? In her honors thesis, senior Courtney Fields seeks to uncover how Latino and white American restaurant workers negotiate speaking Spanish and English. Her research, coursework, and personal experience has led her to discover how English persists as dominant over Spanish, even in a nation that claims no “official” language.