About

Protecting the public’s health requires us to address challenges that are influenced as much by individual and social behavior as they are the sciences. Biology, the environment, social and political systems, and technology intersect to describe the methods of protecting the health and well-being of the population. Public health minors are engaged advocates for creating a healthier world; they are physical and social scientists of public health.

The public health minor is a collaboration between the College of Liberal Arts and the School of Public Health. It is open to any University of Minnesota undergraduate student who wishes to gain an understanding of the language, concepts, and methods of addressing population-level health challenges.

Why minor in public health?

A public health minor will improve your understanding about how local, regional, national, and international issues shape knowledge systems and social practices around health and well-being. In addition, the minor can enhance your application or resume for professional programs, graduate school, or future jobs.

There are also many extracurricular opportunities open to public health minors. Explore various learning abroad options, the Undergraduate Public Health Association, or volunteering opportunities.

Whether you want to explore a potential career in public health or simply supplement your major degree program, the undergraduate public health minor will strengthen your future in any field—from a health profession to law, political science, urban planning, ethnic studies, and beyond.

Resources

Public Health Minor Resources
To declare, see "Declare" for a copy of the Minor declaration form

Events

Humanitarian Crisis Simulation | May 17-19, 2019

This 48-hour immersive learning experience aims to prepare learners to work or volunteer in a humanitarian crisis; assess their personal career alignment with humanitarian aid work; and to develop a greater understanding of the refugee experience. Participants experience living conditions common in humanitarian response environments, while working with an interdisciplinary team to develop a plan to address issues such as infrastructure, health, nutrition, insecurity, and human rights. Graduate credit available.  Learn more at https://globalhealthcenter.umn.edu/HumSim

 

Intergenerational Effects of Trauma | Thursday March 28th, 12-1:00 PM Moose Tower Room 2-580

Effects fo trauma can be long-lasting and transformative. In this lecture, Dr. Yehuda explores the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder and other intergenerational effects of trauma with a specific focus on Holocaust Survivors. Rachel Yehuda, Ph.D. is a Professor and vice Chair of Psychiatry, and Professor of Neuroscience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She is also the Mental Health Patient Care Center Director at the Bronx Veterans Affairs. She has publish on diverse aspects of traumatic stress, and has studied PTSD and resilience in combat veterans, survivors of genocide, interpersonal violence and terrorist, as well as animal models. Lunch provided for the first 40 attendees - NO RSVP required. Questions? Email Kait Macheldet, Program Coordinator at the Women's Health Research Program at kmac@umn.edu

 

Helpful Links

CLA Career Services
Pre-Health Student Resource Center
Graduate School Information for Public Health
Explore Public Health workshop