Alvin Zhou is an Assistant Professor at the Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication. His research centers around computational social science and strategic communication. Specifically, he studies advertising, public relations, audience analytics, and the various ways digital technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence, platform design, mobile access, behavioral trace) are changing their industry practices and social implications.

His work has appeared in journals across communication subfields, such as Social Media + Society, Journal of Communication, Computers in Human Behavior, and Journal of Public Relations Research. His research has received seven top paper awards from the International Communication Association (ICA), the National Communication Association (NCA), and the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC), including the 2020 ICA Robert Heath Award and the 2020 NCA PRIDE Article of the Year Award.

Dr. Zhou earned his PhD in Communication from the University of Pennsylvania Annenberg School. Prior to that, he earned an MA in Statistics and Data Science from the Wharton School and an MA in Strategic Public Relations from the University of Southern California Annenberg School. He graduated from Tsinghua University with dual degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Journalism. At Hubbard, he teaches courses on computational social science and digital media, and mentors students to use insights from data analytics for their journalistic and strategic work.

Educational Background & Specialties
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Educational Background

  • Ph.D.: Communication, The Annenberg School, University of Pennsylvania
  • M.A.: Statistics and Data Science, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
  • M.A.: Strategic Public Relations, The Annenberg School, University of Southern California
  • B.Eng.: Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University
  • B.A.: Journalism, Tsinghua University

Specialties

  • Computational Social Science
  • Audience Analytics
  • Strategic Communication