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Valerie Tiberius standing to the left of Juliette Cherbuliez in a kitchen

The Recipe for Happiness

Valerie Tiberius has published extensively on well-being and how we value it. She believes everyone has a personal recipe for well-being and recognizing that can help you live a fulfilling life. She discusses her ideas, their influence on her teaching, and how they have been useful to psychologists and psychiatrists.
Portrait of Heather Johnson.

Conway and Locke on Personhood

Philosophers John Locke and Anne Finch Conway don’t exactly agree on the answers to some essential philosophical questions: What is a person? How do persons remain the same over time? PhD candidate Heather Johnson investigates these questions and more by studying the similarities and differences in these thinkers’ ideas.
Portrait: Alan Love

Philosophy of Science and the Crisis of Reproducibility

While biologists and psychologists might seek to replicate an experiment, mathematicians might seek to reproduce a proof. Alan Love contends that reproducibility failures should not be taken to undermine the reliability or trustworthiness of science: “We should be confident precisely because scientists sometimes get it wrong, since they know how to process their errors and take advantage of situations when they fail.”
Portrait of Immanuel Kant.

Kant: A Polymath of Modern Thought

Academics have said that all philosophy created in the last 200 years is a response to Immanuel Kant. The influence of his work, however, has spread much further than the realm of philosophy. Today, chemists and politicians alike grapple with the ideas of this poor Prussian boy and how his century-old writings are still shaping modern thought.
Portrait of Matthias Rothe.

The Politics of Kant’s Failures

Philosopher Immanuel Kant’s work delves deep into the concept of freedom in both his moral and political philosophies—so what does a Kant scholar do when these treatments of freedom don’t quite seem to line up? Professor Matthias Rothe explains how inconsistencies in Kant’s work must be understood in a broader historical, social, and political context.

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