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Cones on a jingle dress

The Jingle Dress

The jingle dress dance is a spiritual healing practice dating back to 1918. Guided by the research efforts of Brenda Child—professor and current chair of the Department of American Studies—an exhibit featuring the evolution of the dress will launch in April 2019. How did this tradition emerge from a story, a dream, and the worst pandemic that the modern world has seen?
Portrait of Jimmy Patiño.

Oppression and Agency

Teaching the history of a nation from a single perspective neglects the experiences, hardships, and triumphs faced by groups that don’t fall within the majority. Associate Professor Jimmy Patiño worked with Minneapolis Public Schools to create a Chicano and Latino history course to address this issue and pass down knowledge to the next generation of scholars.
Four faculty standing in front of a photo gallery of previous presidents of the University.

On Purpose: Portrait of Race, Indigeneity, Gender & Sexuality Studies

The Race, Indigeneity, Gender & Sexuality Studies Initiative (RIGS) was established in 2015 to support innovative research, teaching, community-building, and engagement for scholars and students addressing issues on these topics. RIGS is dedicated to bringing faculty and students together to pursue lines of inquiry that challenge systems of power and inequality, assert human dignity, and imagine social transformation.
Portrait of Katherine Beane.

Colonialism to Sovereignty: The Restoration of Bde Maka Ska

In 1829, Dakota leader Mahpiya Wicasta (Cloud Man) led a group of Dakota men on a hunt. The group became trapped in a blizzard for three days, buried under the snow. He later founded an agricultural community on the site, which he called Ḣeyate Otuŋwe, on the shores of a lake that Dakota people today call Bde Maka Ska. Nearly two centuries later, Cloud Man’s great-great grandchildren led the charge to reclaim the lake’s Dakota name, after having long been named after white secessionist John Caldwell Calhoun.” We don’t call it a change, we call it a restoration,” descendant Katherine Beane says when asked about the renaming of Lake Calhoun to Bde Maka Ska.
Portrait of Karen Ho

New Ways to See the World

Cultural anthropologist Karen Ho has recently been appointed director of CLA’s Race, Indigeneity, Gender, and Sexuality Studies initiative, which involves the cultural and social frameworks she has used in her research on the culture of finance. “[There are] a lot of intellectual and social synergies between anthropology and the study and critique of power, race, ethnic, and gender studies.”

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