You are here

News

"Disney Playset After Kinkade" by Paul Shambroom

Paul Shambroom Completes MassMoCA Residency

"During my residency I have been photographing a Disney World Main Street Play Set, circa 1988. The attached image is based on a painting (also attached) of the same subject by American artist Thomas Kinkade (1958-2012). I am also photographing a jigsaw puzzle of the same Kinkade painting. “Past Time: Troubled Visons of the Good Old Days” explores the political and cultural embrace of an idealized America that never existed for many. It contrasts popular imagery of our past with photographs of contemporary life taken in locations that helped form the notion of the “good old days.” My time at MassMOCA includes a recent studio aspect- photographing puzzles and other material depicting idealized American scenes."
Frankie Yu Sofa Residency

2018 SOFA Residency Fellow Frankie Yu Rocks Out

The SOFA Residency is a program initiated in the Spring of 2018 at the Regis Center for Art that provides two undergraduates per semester an opportunity to create a Sculptural Object of Furniture Art with the assistance and funding of Art Department Personnel and Facilities. One of the first two SOFA Residency fellows was Frankie Bingxin Yu, in her final semester as an undergraduate, before finishing her degrees in the Spring of 2018, with undergraduate majors in Psychology and Art, and a minor in Design.
Rachel Breen - "Shroud"

Rachel Breen Exhibition at Perlman Teaching Museum

NORTHFIELD, Minn. — Exactly 1,281 white garments hang from the ceiling of the Perlman Teaching Museum’s Braucher Gallery. The collared shirts, knit sweaters, tights, and other items of clothing glow with an eerie luminosity. The 1,281 garments represent the number of Bangladeshi garment workers killed in the Rana Plaza building collapse in 2013, as well as the New Yorkers killed in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911. Both incidents, which happened 102 years apart on different continents, tragically illustrate the dangerous conditions workers who make cheap clothing have faced and continue to face.
Clarence Morgan: Escalation

Clarence Morgan Exhibition at University of Tennessee, Knoxville

This exhibition of drawings and paintings explore linear patterns that operate in a pictorial space. Utilizing random shapes and biomorphic forms within an intricate network of drawing, collage elements and subtle color, Morgan's work ranges from highly patterned organic painting compositions to meticulously articulated and somewhat minimal collage-drawings. This exhibition is dedicated in memory of Arlene Burke-Morgan (October 13, 1950 - December 16, 2017), the artist's wife and artistic partner of 46 years.
Professor Chris Larson

Chris Larson Awarded 2018 Guggenheim Fellowship

For the past two decades, Minnesota–based artist Chris Larson has developed a multimedia practice that is rooted in sculpture and incorporates film, video, photography, drawing and sound. His work focuses on building and reproducing spaces, objects and specific architectural sites that look familiar but have been severely affected, disfigured, or transformed through relocation, replication and distortion. His most recent works examines specific architectural sites that are deeply connected to history and location.
Jordan Rosenow Amid Structure

Jordan Rosenow Exhibition at the Rochester Center for Art

Amid Structure is a multimedia installation which looks closely at minimal gestures and the subtle intimacy between objects and architecture. Raw building materials, typically used to solidify permanent structures such as 2x4s, pipes, and steel are the foundation for both domestic and industrial spaces that house/shape the body and its experiences. These materials are created and used in mass quantities where uniformity is expected and they remain hidden in the interior of walls.
Laying in Wait - Emmett Ramstad

Laying in Wait with Emmett Ramstad

Laying in Wait examines what it feels like to wait. The unpunctuated, endless time of physically being in one place and mentally miles away/nowhere. The dentist asks how your day is while your mouth is wide open and you stare at a waterfall on the ceiling. You check and recheck your email while going pee. The hold music on speakerphone becomes your breakfast soundtrack. Can this space of non-presence or stasis be a place of potential? In this time of political turmoil, which is actually all times, is it possible to have productive waiting?
Leschke Noodle Bowl

Asia Ward - Artists in the Kitchen

Beginning December 27, 2017, 50 all-women artist/chef-restaurateur teams met to join forces in an innovative partnership whereby chefs are inspiring the artists to produce new artworks, culminating in the exhibition. ]To honor the mission of Textile Center, each of the artists is incorporating a textile process, material, or sensibility in their completed work. Recognizing the abundance of local culinary and visual art talent of Twin Cities-area women, “this invitational exhibition forges a new partnership that celebrates the work of women artists in both the art studio and culinary worlds.”— Artists in the Kitchen Organizers.
Mary Simon-Casati and Liliya Williams

Can "The Invisible" Be Pictured?

One snowy afternoon in December, several women gathered in artist Mary Simon-Casati’s southwest Minneapolis home for a little lunch and a lightweight chat about astrophysics and art. The firelit living room crackled with energy; conversation sparked and flared, bouncing from philosopher to art historian to physicist and back, traversing the cosmic terrain of dark matter, energy, quarks and their quasi-poetic names. “The thing about particles,” the artist said offhandedly, “is that none of us can see them, ever. We don’t know what they look like. Science can figure out what sort of spin they have and what it interacts with. But otherwise, we’re dealing with the unknown.” Her latest paintings and sculpture explore, in visual terms, phenomena that are largely intangible, ineffable and unseen. The result of three years of research and an intensive yearlong exchange of ideas with University of Minnesota astrophysicist Liliya Williams, her solo show “Smashing the Invisible” is on view at the university’s Regis Center for Art through Feb. 10.
Ana Mendieta Exhibition

Ana Mendieta Exhibition Travels to Berlin in Spring of 2018

Ana Mendieta (1948-1985) represents one of the most outstanding artistic positions of the 1970s and 1980s. From 20 April to 22 July 2018, the Martin-Gropius-Bau will present her multi-layered film work, which has been recently restored and digitised, the result of several years of research work. Ana Mendieta’s work moves freely between disciplines such as body art, land art and performance art, without adhering to any particular medium or movement. The common element is the recurrent use of the abstracted shape of the female form in dialogue with the surrounding environment of nature—not least in order to question the separation between nature and the human body. Her artistic work transcends many boundaries, including those of artistic disciplines, geographic and political spaces, and research into history, gender and culture.
Lorena Molina - Nothing Hurts Like Home

Lorena Molina (MFA '15) Exhibits at the 621 Gallery in Tallahassee

Nothing Hurts like Home explores my complicated relationship with homemaking as a refugee who has experienced displacement.This project is a fragmented visual diary/Study of the challenges and markers of making a home in the between. Home has always been a battlefield. Home is where I was taught to fear. How do you make home when going home is too dangerous? What do you do with the pain that home brings? This work was influenced by my move to rural central NY as I simultaneously became a US citizen. It deals with the dislocation, otherness, and white washing caused by the process of making home in the unwelcoming. This work explores the ways I hold on to my cultural roots as everywhere I go demands adaptation and assimilation. The performances and photographs were made in El Salvador and Sauquiot, NY. They are my attempts to make sense of and connections to a state I did not choose. In 2017, I returned to my homeland after 14 years of being told it is a place I should not be. I visited my childhood home that now is ruled by gangs and I reconnected with my father. The photographs and videos aim to make a visual map of the interconnections between the land I was forced to leave, my place here, and what remains of the memory I once called home. This work is my reconciliation and acceptance of a reality that it is part of the immigrant experience to never truly be there nor here; while at the same time I aim to find the possibilities of existing in a state of liminality to create a space where my brown body can thrive and exist.
Xavier Tavera

'After the War' with Xavier Tavera - Lecturer and MFA ('17)

When Xavier Tavera (M.F.A. ‘17) moved to the Twin Cities in 1996 from Mexico City, he swapped a future law career for life as a photographer. But he also underwent an even more profound personal transition. “In Mexico, I’m nothing,” he says, referring to the fact that he can’t easily be labeled in a society where so many of his fellow citizens look like him and speak his native tongue. “But here, I’m Mexican and an immigrant and a person of color.” Understanding how that experience has impacted his fellow Latinos and their Minnesota subcultures has become a guiding force for his work. His most recent show, “AMVETS Post #5,” which is at the Minnesota History Center through April, includes 35 portraits of Mexican and Mexican-American military veterans who have returned home to St. Paul’s West Side from the battlefields of World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. Many of Tavera’s subjects enlisted in order to become U.S. citizens, only to see their rights undercut when they returned home. Some felt abandoned by the country they fought to protect.
Avigail Manneberg

Avigail Manneberg Receives 2018 Grant from the Human Rights Initiative

"A Contested Home: Memory, Commemoration and Rights around Forced Migration of Palestinians in the Galilee" will use artistic representation to engage with issues of forced migration and displacement. It explores how visual and theatrical storytelling can redress historical amnesia by seeking to foster dialogue between two groups who have a long and contentious history, Palestinians with Israeli citizenship and Jewish Israelis. Professors Kuftinec and Manneberg will work with eight local artists to develop an interdisciplinary body of work culminating in an exhibition and public art installation.