You are here

Union Pacific Fellows

Because of the generous support from the Union Pacific Corporation, the Center is able to offer several research and copying grants to early modern studies minors each year to support a wide variety of research projects. Below are recent recipients of these grants.

Demetri Debe (History): With my CEMH grant I was able to travel to New Orleans and conduct research at several archives which house colonial documents in French and Spanish. Because of the research I completed with this grant, I was able to co-coordinate a panel at the SAWH (Southern Association For Women Historians) conference in Charleston, SC. Our panel was titled, “Pure Creole: Women of Color in the Making of New Orleans Food." My paper outlined African descended women’s work in colonial food system of New Orleans with a focus on buying and selling in the public food market. I am very grateful for the opportunities provided by the Center for Early Modern History and the UP Grant program.

Jonas Erickson (English): In the summer of 2015, I visited England on a Union Pacific Dissertation Research Grant in order to visit archives at dozens of libraries in London, Bedford, Cambridge, and Oxford. For my dissertation on early essay culture in England, I photographed a still-unpublished manuscript of a book of essays, along with readers’ marginalia in hundreds of books of literary nonfiction in the 17th century. This project has furthered my understanding of the essay culture as produced by both writers and readers.

Matthew King (History): In the winter of 2015/16, I traveled to Sicily and Southern Italy to conduct archival research relating to my project on the relationship between Italy and North Africa during the Middle Ages. My most important find came from the archive of the monastery of Badia di Cavia, where I found a number of charters that call William I the “King of Sicily and Italy and Africa.” These charters help shed perspective on how we view Norman involvement in North Africa during the mid-twelfth century. While in Sicily, I was also able to visit the royal palaces of the Byzantine, Latin, and Islamic influences.”