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Portrait of Lizabeth Finestack

Getting Speech Up to Speed

Difficulties in language development can cause children to fall behind academically and socially. Through her research with early language intervention and children with neurodevelopmental disorders, Dr. Liza Finestack is working to improve clinical practices and keep children from this population on track.
Portrait of Payton Counts

Major Potential

“Even though I’m not using my degree in the way I imagined I would, I wouldn’t have gotten my job had I not had it.” 2018 SLHS graduate Payton Counts is pursuing a career path different than many in her field. Through the help of her education in CLA and the faculty behind her, she is able to do meaningful work in suicide prevention for native youth in the Twin Cities.
Two women, one older one younger, sitting on chairs in a CATSS lab with microphones and padding on the walls

On Purpose: Portrait of CATSS

Sensory loss, or loss of vision, hearing, and balance increases with age and can be related to a decline in quality of life. By 2050, the Census Bureau predicts that the number of persons 65 years and older will approach 20 percent of the U.S. population. Sensory loss of all types is prevalent among aging people, accounting for a sharp decline in social engagement, and a significant reduction in socioeconomic potential.
Portrait of Lily Obeda.

Choose Your Own Adventure

“Once you find your passion and the piece of you that clicks, everything else falls into place.” That’s the advice of 2018 graduate Lily Obeda, whose double major in GSD with a Scandinavian & Finnish emphasis and speech-language-hearing sciences has prepared her for an exciting career in academia.
Photo of Professor Jessica Brown

The Brainiac

Jessica Brown, one our newest faculty members in speech-language-hearing sciences, is changing the way we look at traumatic brain injury and augmentative alternative communication.
Photo of 8 people sitting in a row, having a discussion about stuttering.

The Way We Talk

A screening of "The Way We Talk,” a documentary about living with stuttering by Michael Turner, sparked meaningful conversations about building community and support—for people who stutter and those who care about them.