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The Politics of Loyalty

In a properly functioning democracy, what is supposed to come first: beliefs about what kinds of government policies would be best for oneself, or for the nation, or for one’s party? Hold that thought for a beat, and think about the concept of “democratic inversion,” as explained by Professor Howard Lavine.
Helen M. Kinsella standing outside of Northrop

War Fatigue

Associate Professor Helen M. Kinsella’s work focusing on gender and violence has taken her to Central America and Sri Lanka. She examines how the distinction between combatants and civilians is decided and maintained in war and international law. She is currently working on a book on war and sleep.
Portrait of Mark Bell

Nuclear Reaction

The United States, Great Britain, and South Africa have all utilized nuclear weapons in different ways. How are international politics affected by a country’s nuclear arsenal? Assistant Professor Mark Bell explores this question.
Dean John Coleman

Views from the U 2018

On October 9, 2018, we invited alumni and the public to join us for Views from the U. This year's event focused on the midterm elections and included faculty talks on campaign strategy, political advertisements, campaign finance, race and gender, the national economy, foreign policy, and electoral rules and procedures.

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