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Portrait: Professor Timothy R Johnson

SCOTUS Notes

Professor Timothy Johnson wanted to shine a light on a rich primary source for researchers in political science and law--the handwritten notes of past Supreme Court justices. But first, he needed help from a few hundred citizen scientists.

New Constitution or Nothing! The Promise and Pitfalls of Chile's...

In the wee hours of Friday, November 15, 2019, Chile reached a historic milestone: Congressional representatives from nearly all political parties, across the political spectrum, signed an agreement to open the path to a new constitution. Professor Lisa Hilbink shares her observations of this development in the country's governance.
Nancy Luxon poses for a portrait.

Archives of Infamy

History provides invaluable insight into the modern world. Professor Nancy Luxon is using letters from the 18th century to gain new perspectives on how ideas of political power and family crystalize into social relationships and power regimes. "The letters help us think about the ways power and justice touch on the lives of ordinary people," Luxon says.

The Politics of Loyalty

In a properly functioning democracy, what is supposed to come first: beliefs about what kinds of government policies would be best for oneself, or for the nation, or for one’s party? Hold that thought for a beat, and think about the concept of “democratic inversion,” as explained by Professor Howard Lavine.
Howard Lavine

The Politics of Loyalty

Howard Lavine, professor of political science, focuses his research on the area of political psychology. Lavine believes there’s been a shift in American values that focus more on political party rather than personal beliefs. “People are less motivated by policy substance than they are with showing their loyalty to the team,” he says.

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