Interdisciplinary Collaborative Workshop Award

The Interdisciplinary Collaborative Workshop (ICW) program spurs new collaborations among scholars in CLA and beyond. It provides support to bring together faculty, staff, postdoctoral researchers, and graduate students from a variety of fields to intensively study a topic. Proposed forms of workshops may include (but are not limited to) reading groups, research projects, seminars, symposia, conferences, or virtual centers.

The program originated in the college Roadmap process, an ongoing consultative process that is driven by students, staff, and faculty and our various publics. ICWs are funded by the Joan Aldous Innovation Fund, in support of the College's Roadmap goal to generate new levels of innovative research through focused investment strategies.

Now in its fourth year, the ICW program has supported 19 workshops. Workshop leadership teams have collectively brought together 216 faculty and staff members from CLA, 90 from other units at the University of Minnesota, and hundreds of scholars and professionals from outside the University. These workshops in turn actively engage hundreds of participants—students, community members, artists, policymakers—and host events drawing many more.

The following workshops are in their award periods but many of the previous workshops are still active and are described further below.

Fall 2020 Awards

  • ArTeS: Catalyzing Creative Interdependence supports each collaborator’s experience of wholeness. Our process of co-creating a vision for this intercollegiate ArTeS initiative is sustained with a diverse, equitable, and inclusive network and exchange, among people, communities, and disciplines.
  • Refusing Disposability: Racial and Disability Justice Toward Another World aims to further the interrogation of, and resistance to, the causes and consequences of disposability. Thinking alongside disability and racial justice activists, our three-year interdisciplinary workshop examines intersectional analyses, public histories, and transformative praxis as a form of counter-knowledge that contends that #NoBodyIsDisposable. 

Fall 2019 Awards

Spring 2019 Awards

Fall 2018 Awards

  • Democracy under Threat: Public Scholarship and Teaching addresses issues concerning democracy, populism, and racial nationalism as well as crime, punishment, and human rights.
  • The Black Midwest Initiative is a collective committed to advocating for the lives of people of African descent as they are situated throughout the Midwest and Rust Belt regions of the United States. 
  • The Many Faces of Reproducibility is an interdisciplinary exploration that works to advance cutting-edge investigation, innovate how researchers are trained, and enhance public understanding of science.

Full Grant Awards Fall 2020

Anticipated Award Term: 2021-23

ArTeS: Catalyzing Creative Interdependence

ArTeS is an intercollegiate initiative, emerging from CLA, that centers the arts in Art+Technology+Science collaborations at the University of Minnesota. We affirm, as our core value, systematically creating a diverse, equitable, and inclusive network and exchange among people, communities, and disciplines essential to creating and realizing a transformative vision of ArTeS that supports creative interdependence. ArTeS proposes an expanded collaboration among faculty, students, staff, and community collaborators to participate in the process of co-creating a vision, prototyping participatory activities (virtual and on-campus), and generating an implementation plan that will guide us as we seek external funding for this initiative.

Team Members Affiliation
Diane Willow Department of Art
Vicente Diaz Department of American Indian Studies
Sumanth Gopinath School of Music
Daniel Keefe Department of Computer Science & Engineering
Colin McFadden Liberal Arts Technologies & Innovation Services
Jennifer Newsom School of Architecture
Virajita Singh Center for Sustainable Building Research

Refusing Disposability: Racial and Disability Justice Toward Another World

COVID-19 amplifies vulnerabilities that render disabled, Black, Indigenous, and other bodies “disposable” and “sacrificable.” Thinking alongside disability and racial justice activists, our three-year interdisciplinary workshop examines intersectional analyses, public histories, and transformative praxis as a form of counter-knowledge that contends that #NoBodyIsDisposable. We will disseminate this knowledge by creating new University of Minnesota courses and an open-access public-facing curriculum. Ultimately, we aim to further the interrogation of, and resistance to, the causes and consequences of disposability.

Team Members Affiliation
Jennifer EunJung Row Department of French & Italian
Angela Carter UMN Disability Resource Center
Jigna Desai Department of Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies
Program in Asian American Studies
Erin Durban Department of Anthropology
Rachel Presley Department of Writing Studies
Department of Communication Studies
Nathan Stenberg PhD candidate in the Department of Theatre Arts & Dance
Jessica Horvath Williams President's Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies