Katherine E. Nash Gallery

We are closed to the general public for Fall 2020 in an effort to Stop the Spread of Covid-19.
Learn more about the University of Minnesota’s response and policies here.


We are open to University of Minnesota faculty, staff, and students by appointment only.
Book your appointment at z.umn.edu/nash-appts.

ON VIEW NOW
4,5,6 (MFA Thesis)
September 8 - October 17, 2020
Full Press Release
Object & Price List

Exhibition postcard image featuring a ceramic plate with objects such as salt, yarn, a goat figurine, dice, an olive pit, and beaded bullet fringe.
The Katherine E. Nash Gallery at the University of Minnesota presents 4, 5, 6, the 2020 Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition featuring the work of Lauren Flynn, Kevin O’Meara, Roger Ourthiague Jr., Simcha Smith, Erika Terwilliger, and Kuab Maiv Yaj - Koua Mai Yang.

Lauren Flynn’s work comes about through the creation of structures which make room for and are transformed by play and coincidence. Working with photography and books, Kevin O’Meara’s meditative approach to image-making explores the relationship between spirituality, addiction, and grief. Driven by a desire for novelty and learning new techniques, Roger Ourthiague Jr.’s interdisciplinary practice is constantly changing yet centers on our shared experience regarding mass media. Simcha Smith’s sculptures and performances use food, sacred objects, and language to create fragile and temporal installations. Using a variety of materials, Erika Terwilliger creates systems that interrogate the collecting of objects and ephemerality. In my practice I investigate what we consider worthy of collection and how the perceived preciousness of an object can lead to its removal from cycles of growth and renewal. Kuab Maiv Yaj - Koua Mai Yang engages with multiple mediums and disciplines within Western and Hmong notions of art to investigate recurring themes surrounding her bi-cultural identity, history, home, female experiences and Hmong patriarchy.

EXHIBITION VIDEO TOURS

Roger Ourthiague Jr.
Through choir music, prose, colored lights, strange sounds, and candles within the pamphlets, Roger Ourthiague Jr. introduces the character, Propaganda, both an embodiment of its definitions and tropes, and an infinitely complicated entity with corporeal account. This work is an investigation of a formattable persuasion tactic and is political at its core. It is not political in a specific sense; it mediates the complexity of today’s polarization giving space for apolitical contemplation. Watch the full video animation of Propaganda as part of the installation [here].

Website: www.rogerojr.com

Erika Terwilliger 
Through laborious processes of dyeing, weaving, and forming clay, Erika Terwilliger’s installation, Second Stomach, investigates the evolving relationship between tool and maker, utility and value. For months, Terwilliger sorted, recorded, weighed, dryed, and stored all her food waste. Terwilliger is interested in domestic systems that move in cycles, in processes of generation and preservation.

Website: www.erikaterwilliger.com
Instagram: @erikaterwilliger

 
In Memory of George Floyd: A Statement from the Katherine E. Nash Gallery
In Memory of George Floyd: A Statement from the Katherine E. Nash Gallery

On behalf of the Katherine E. Nash Gallery, operated by the Department of Art at the University of Minnesota, we add our voices to the collective expressions of sadness, grief, and outrage heard across our community, the country, and the world in memory of George Floyd.

We believe that a university art gallery can make a contribution in the struggle for racial equality and justice -- by showing and promoting the work of a wide variety of artists, including artists of color, and by increasing the dialogue in support of the artists and their work. The Katherine E. Nash Gallery aspires to be a center of discourse on the practice of visual art and its relationship to culture and community -- a place where we examine our assumptions about the past and suggest possibilities for the future. 

This powerful image of Sarah Vaughan by the great American photographer Hugh Bell will be included in the forthcoming exhibition A Picture Gallery of the Soul, planned for the Katherine E. Nash Gallery in 2021. The result of 5 years of curatorial research and planning, A Picture Gallery of the Soul will feature the work of African American artists from Minnesota and across the country whose practice incorporates the photographic medium, and will include diverse artistic perspectives from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

Photograph of Sarah Vaughan by Hugh Bell
Hugh Bell (1927-2012)
Sarah Vaughan, 1955
Lifetime Silver Gelatin Print
© The Estate of Hugh Bell

A Picture Gallery of the Soul will demonstrate that the history of American photography and the history of African American culture and politics are two interconnected histories. From the daguerreotypes made by Jules Lion in New Orleans in 1840, to the lectures on the possibilities of photography delivered by Frederick Douglass in the 1860s, to the iconic images of Jazz made in the 20th century, to the Instagram post of the Baltimore Uprising made by Devin Allen in 2015, photography has chronicled African American life and African Americans have defined the possibilities of photography. A Picture Gallery of the Soul will honor, celebrate, investigate and interpret Black history, culture and politics in America.

We believe that art can help us become more compassionate, better human beings. We dedicate our work to that belief.

Herman J. Milligan, Jr., Ph.D.
Howard Oransky
Exhibition Curators, A Picture Gallery of the Soul

Teréz Iacovino
Nash Gallery Assistant Curator

Our thanks to the family and Estate of Hugh Bell and Gartenberg Media.

 

Katherine E. Nash Gallery: Archive Feature
View works from the archive featuring The House We Built: Feminist Art Then and Now.

Georgiana Kettler - Spirit House
Georgiana Kettler, Spirit House, 1981
Acrylic on shaped canvas
with wood and asphalt shingles
60 x 33 x 3 in.
Collection of Judy Schwartau

From January 22 - February 23, 2013, the Katherine E. Nash Gallery presented The House We Built: Feminist Art Then and Now, a series of exhibitions and public programs that explored the national network of feminist art activity that emerged in the 1970s and changed the course of contemporary art.

The exhibition in the Katherine E. Nash Gallery was curated by Joyce Lyon, Associate Professor Emerita of Drawing and Painting, and Howard Oransky, Director of the Nash Gallery. The exhibition was co-sponsored by the Department of Art, the Department of Art History, the Department of Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies, and the University Libraries with support from the College of Liberal Arts Freshman Research and Creative Awards Program. 

Joyce Lyon prepared the following slideshow which can be accessed [here]. This presentation highlights the artist members of the WARM Gallery Collective, whose work was included in the Katherine E. Nash Gallery exhibition.

The related exhibition in the T.R. Anderson Gallery was curated by Deborah Boudewyns, Arts, Architecture and Landscape Architecture Librarian, and Christina Michelon, M.A. student in the Department of Art History. A concurrent exhibition of work by Department of Art emeritus faculty member Josephine Lutz Rollins (1896 – 1989) and the students who received the scholarship in her name was presented in the Quarter Gallery.  The exhibition was organized by Howard Oransky, Joe Sullivan, and the Josephine Lutz Rollins family.

Josephine Lutz Rollins (1896 - 1989) attended Cornell College in Iowa, the University of Minnesota, the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, D.C. and the Hans Hoffman Studio in Munich. She was a founding member of the Stillwater Art Colony in 1933 and the Westlake Gallery, a women’s art collective, in 1965. Her teaching career at the University of Minnesota spanned nearly 40 years from 1927 - 1965. She was among the first faculty, and the first woman, hired to teach in the new Department of Art at the University of Minnesota, when it was created in 1947 and chaired by Harvey H. Arnason. Josephine taught and mentored countless students while helping to establish the study of studio art within the University of Minnesota curriculum. To honor the important legacy of her work as an artist, teacher, and mentor the Lutz Rollins family established the Josephine Lutz Rollins Fellowship in 1990.

Josephine Lutz Rollins - Collection of Works
Works by Josephine Lutz Rollins
Katherine E. Nash Gallery: Planning Your Visit

We are closed to the general public for Fall 2020 in an effort to Stop the Spread of Covid-19.
Learn more about the University of Minnesota’s response and policies here.


We will be open to University of Minnesota faculty, staff, and students by appointment only.
Book your appointment at z.umn.edu/nash-appts.

Contact the Gallery
Howard Oransky
Gallery Director
horansky@umn.edu
(612) 624-6518

Follow us on Instagram | @umn_nash

Location
Regis Center for Art (East)
405 21st Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455

We are accessible via Metro Transit's Blue LineGreen Line, Bus route 2, and Bus route 7. Parking is available nearby on the street, at the 21st Avenue South ramp5th Street South lot, and 19th Avenue South ramp; hourly or event rates may apply. Exhibitions and related events are FREE and open to the public.

Mission
The Katherine E. Nash Gallery is a research laboratory for the practice and interpretation of the visual arts. We believe the visual arts have the capacity to interpret, critique and expand on all of human experience. Our engagement with the visual arts helps us to discover who we are and understand our relationships to each other and society. The Katherine E. Nash Gallery will be a center of discourse on the practice of visual art and its relationship to culture and community -- a place where we examine our assumptions about the past and suggest possibilities for the future. The Nash Gallery will play an indispensable role in the educational development of students, faculty, staff and the community.

History
Professor Katherine "Katy" E. Nash (1910–1982), a member of the Department of Art faculty from 1961–1976, proposed that the University of Minnesota Student Unions provide space and staffing for a university art gallery. The gallery bearing her name was founded in 1979. Originally located on the lower concourse of Willey Hall, the Minnesota Student Unions supervised the Nash Gallery until 1992 when the Department of Art assumed administration of the space. In the fall of 2003, the gallery moved to its current location in the Regis Center for Art. Learn more about Katy Nash.

Katherine E. Nash Gallery: Past Exhibitions

Cropped graphite portrait of a woman's face by artist Melissa Cooke Benson
The Beginning of Everything:
An Exhibition of Drawings

January 21 - March 28, 2020

Queer Forms exhibition graphic

Queer Forms 
September 10 – December 7, 2019

My Theory Is exhibition post card
My Theory Is...
May 7 – 16, 2019

MFA 2019 postcard image
The House | The Yard 
April 9 – 27, 2019

The Form Will Find Way postcard image
The Form Will Find Its Way:
Contemporary Ceramic Sculptural Abstraction

January 22 – March 30, 2019

On Purpose: Portrait of the Liberal Arts postcard image
On Purpose: Portrait of the Liberal Arts
September 12 – December 8, 2018

BFA 2018 postcard image
www.mit.edu/~ruchill/lazycurator.submit.html
May 1 – 12, 2018

MFA 2018 postcard image
UHN-URTH 
April 3 – 21, 2018

Politics of Weed postcard image
Politics of Weeds
February 20 – March 24, 2018


Land Body Industry postcard image
Land Body Industry
January 16 – February 10, 2018

World of Matter postcard image
World of Matter: Mobilizing Materialities
September 14 – December 9, 2017

Artist on the Verge 8 work by Kelsey Bosch
Art(ists) on the Verge 8
June 1 – July 15, 2017

BFA 2017 postcard image
Message Pending
May 2 – 13, 2017

MFA 2017 postcard image
Some Assembly Required
April 4 – 22, 2017

What I Think About postcard image
What I Think About
January 17 – March 25, 2017