Regis West Gallery

  • Abstract portrait
    Brandon Chambers, Ma, 2015, Mixed media digital print---She said it around the dinner table on Christmas or Thanksgiving or just a day to celebrate. I was too young to remember clearly but I remember it was cold outside and she had been flown to the U.S. I vaguely remember it was for something medical. "Whoy! Mi soon gone, hehe!" Over the next twenty years or so it became something like a joke. Funny in part because every year, my great-grandmother lived another year, but also in part because she said it in that way people say things when either they know they will live on, or know that moving on isn't the end of the world. As the planet's seemingly apocalyptic narrative trots along its course, and my own spirit threatens to falter, something of her spirit enters me, or its ever-presence becomes visible and I connect with it. It is not hopeful, but also not dreadful. She compels me to say, not with my words but with my being, "Whoy! Mi soon gone, hehe!"
  • Image of a raccoon skull covered in felted wool fiber
    Taylor Johnson, Ritual for a Raccoon, 2020, Felted raw wool, raccoon skull
  • Sculptural Japanese paper positioned over two ceramic vessels with dried flowers
    Taylor Johnson, Ritual for a Fox, 2020, Japanese paper, methylcellulose, beeswax, found ceramic vessels, dried hydrangea flowers
  • Sculptural Japanese paper installed on a wall
    Taylor Johnson, Ritual for a Rabbit, 2020, Japanese paper, methylcellulose, beeswax, found ceramic vessels, dried hydrangea flowers
  • Abstract painting of a house at the center of a bull's eye
    Julia Maiuri, The House, 2020, Oil on canvas---It’s dark, but a familiarity washes over me and I know that I am back at the house. From the street I can see that the light is on in my old room, but something tells me that nobody is actually home. A magnetism brings me closer, I don’t want to go in but the door is unlocked; it’s always unlocked. As I turn the knob to enter, I wake up in fear, mistaking shadows on the wall for an intruder approaching my bed.
  • Diptych photograph of a chair made out of craft paper juxtaposed next to a folded stack of craft paper
    Prerna, Brown paper stack on a plastic chair, 2020, Paper, plastic chair---As I make yet another flimsy stack of brown paper chairs, the paper becomes a metaphor for myself and other brown bodies -- molding, enduring, persevering, and resisting. Through the cycle of watering and wilting, the stack exhales as it sinks a little closer to the ground. The top-most chair looks like nothing but a sheet of brown paper atop many other sheets of brown paper.
  • Image of an open suitcase containing ceramic forms resting on top of cotton fiber
    Sayge Carroll, Dreams in Cotton, 2020, Cotton, paper, porcelain, briefcase---In the cotton fields as a child he dreamt of life as a business man.
  • Abstract portrait
  • Image of a raccoon skull covered in felted wool fiber
  • Sculptural Japanese paper positioned over two ceramic vessels with dried flowers
  • Sculptural Japanese paper installed on a wall
  • Abstract painting of a house at the center of a bull's eye
  • Diptych photograph of a chair made out of craft paper juxtaposed next to a folded stack of craft paper
  • Image of an open suitcase containing ceramic forms resting on top of cotton fiber

 A woman hears the voices of her female ancestors as she grapples with grief. - Hawona Sullivan Janzen

ON VIEW NOW
Ghosts in the Corridor
October 26 - November 6, 2020

Nearly a year into a global pandemic, we live in an extended liminal space where all that feels familiar is beyond arms reach. What does intimacy look like without physicality? How do we experience memory when removed from its relation to time and space? Ghosts in the Corridor features the work of eight graduate students exploring visitations and hauntings; relationship to ancestors, ritual, and mourning; animacy of objects, animals, and landscapes; multiple realities and dream worlds. If only for a brief moment, we invite each of our ghosts to exist and talk to one another in the same space. Artists in this online exhibition include Sayge Carroll, Brandon Chambers, Taylor Johnson, Julia Maiuri, Prerna, Caitlin Skaalrud, and Hawona Sullivan Janzen.

University of Minnesota faculty, staff, and students can visit a phyical version of this exhibition at the Regis Center for Art in room E138. Artists in this physical exhibition include Nicholas Bauch, Sayge Carroll, Brandon Chambers, Taylor Johnson, Julia Maiuri, Prerna, Caitlin Skaalrud, and Hawona Sullivan Janzen.


Planning Your Visit

We are currently closed to the public for thre Fall 2020 semester in an effort to Stop the Spread of Covid-19.

An open atrium space spanning two floors, the Regis West Gallery presents a variety of student exhibitions and community collaborations. The gallery hosts the biannual Bachelor of Arts Capstone exhibition and annually partners with the Art Educators of Minnesota to exhibit the Minnesota Scholastic Art Awards in recognition of K-12 artistic talent across the state of Minnesota.

We are accessible via Metro Transit's Blue LineGreen Line, Bus route 2, and Bus route 7. Parking is available nearby on the street, at the 21st Avenue South ramp5th Street South lot, and 19th Avenue South ramp; hourly or event rates may apply. Exhibitions and related events are FREE and open to the public.

Contact the Gallery

Teréz Iacovino 
Assistant Curator
(612) 624-7900
iaco0030@umn.edu

Location

Regis Center for Art (West)
418 21st Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55454

Gallery Hours

Tuesday - Saturday
11:00 am - 7:00 pm