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Lee on Pandemic Brain Fog

Brain fog, the feeling of sluggish or fuzzy thinking, is a common experience; however, the pandemic may be increasing this experience. With isolation, added interruptions, and the stress of the past year, your ability to focus on and complete tasks can be affected. In a Duluth News Tribune article titled, “Minnesota experts share tips to ease pandemic 'brain fog',” Rich Lee, PhD, Distinguished McKnight University Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, states that brain fog is currently not well understood.

Ones and Alumnus Receive Award

Congratulations to Deniz S. Ones, PhD, Hellervik Professor of Industrial Psychology, Distinguished McKnight University Professor, and Distinguished University Teacher of the University of Minnesota’s Department of Psychology, and I-O Area Alumnus Michael Wilmot who were awarded the 2021 Joyce and Robert Hogan Award for Personality and Work Performance by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) for their Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America paper on Conscientiousness.

Lee on the Rise of Anti-Asian Hate Crimes

On March 16th, a gunman opened fire on several Atlanta-area spas, killing eight people with six being Asian women. This horrific attack was just one of many as the US has seen an upward trend in anti-Asian hate crimes. In a Minnesota Daily article titled, “Asian and Asian American community members heal and process after Atlanta-area shootings,” the article shares how at a local level, student groups across campus such as the Asian-American Student Union (ASU) have collaborated with each other to hold safe spaces. Rich Lee, PhD, Distinguished McKnight University Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, drafted the department’s statement in response to these attacks.

Frazier on PTSD From Police Footage

Throughout the Derek Chauvin trial, witnesses have taken to the stand to describe what they saw the night of George Floyd’s death. In a Star Tribune article titled, “Derek Chauvin trial shows people who film police violence later struggle with trauma,” Pat Frazier, PhD, professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, states that the experiences described in court are consistent with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Study Suggests Cannabis Use in Adolescence Leads to Poorer School Performance and...

A new University of Minnesota study authored by a team of researchers in the Department of Psychology and Institute of Child Development (ICD) suggests that cannabis use in adolescence leads to poorer school performance and lower socioeconomic attainment, but not higher rates of mental health or cognitive concerns in adulthood. The study was conducted with thousands of identical twins from the age of 11 into adulthood. The study was led by Jonathan Schaefer and the team included William Iacono, Stephen Malone, Matt McGue, Scott Vrieze, and Sylia Wilson.

Lee Quoted in the Minnesota Daily

Rich Lee, PhD, Distinguished McKnight University Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, recently reflected on Dr. Erika Lee’s (an Asian American studies professor at the U of M) testimony before Congress in a Minnesota Daily article titled, “‘Unfortunately, it is very American’: UMN professor testifies before Congress about anti-Asian violence.”

Psychology Undergrads Present at Tate Advising Conference

The John Tate Professional Development Conference and Awards Ceremony is held to support and celebrate U of M faculty, administrators, advisors, career counselors, and the extended community interested in academic advising. The conference is held annually in March. This year, three undergraduate students in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota - Cassie Davis, BA; Emma Estrella, BS; and Kate DeWitt, BA presented on the importance of peer mentorship within a virtual learning environment. View their presentation.

Sisk Receives APA Grant

Caitlin Sisk, graduate student in the Psychology Department at the University of Minnesota, was awarded a grant of $1,000 from the American Psychological Association. The “Early Graduate Student Researcher Award” is highly selective, granted to only three applicants each year. It will help to fund Sisk’s virtual reality research, as well as online versions of her current experiments. This award recognizes students who are conducting outstanding research at a graduate level. The funds are able to be used for direct research expenses, software, and/or conference travel. The award will end on 05/31/2022.

Oxenham in CI Hackathon

Andrew Oxenham, Distinguished McKnight University professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, was part of the team that organized the world’s first Cochlear Implant Hackathon. Oxenham and Jordan Beim, postdoctoral research associate in the Center for Applied and Translational Sensory Sciences (CATSS), teamed up with representatives from the University of California San Francisco and Advanced Bionics to create the event.

Landers Creates I-O Youtube Channel

Richard Landers, associate professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, recently released a YouTube channel titled “The Great IO Get-together - The GIG.” The channel features an industrial-organizational psychology variety show, hosted by Dr. Landers and Dr. Tara Behrend, covering an array of relevant topics in the field. Each show is recorded with a live audience on YouTube Live, and past shows are also available for viewing any time.

Psychology DEI Plan for Feedback

After the killing of George Floyd over the summer, Jeff Simpson, department chair in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, charged the diversity committee with creating short and long-term action items for the department. A Minnesota Daily article entitled, “Psychology department releases equity and inclusion draft plan for feedback” reports that this month, the committee released a draft of departmental recommendations and are asking for feedback from students, faculty, and staff.
Headshot of Dr. Harriett Haynes

Interview with Harriett Haynes

In honor of Black History Month, we spoke with three PhD alumni from the Counseling Psychology program to learn about what drew them to Psychology and how they are now making an impact as professionals. They also told us about why it is essential that we work to increase Black representation in our program, the profession, and the field. Harriett Haynes, Ph.D., ‘79

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